AP Literature-period 4 Assignments

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Past Assignments

Due:

6/4, Fri. Scholar's Week in Google Classroom

6/4, Fri. Scholar's Week

* Please note: This week, you will follow an individualized action plan based on your academic progress.

Check-in: What is one word that describes how you are feeling?  Respond in the Zoom chat box.

Individualized Action Plan (more details will be given in class):

Attend virtual class meetings to receive NX coaching and complete previous course assignments.
Attend virtual class meetings to make up current coursework, which includes completing missing or incomplete assignments in Google classroom. 
Break-out Rooms
Work on asynchronous assignments -- Final Presentation

Due:

5/27-28 AP Literature Review  in Google Classroom

5/27-28 AP Literature Review

Do Now/Energizer: What questions or concerns do you still have about the AP Literature Exam?

Join a break-out room based on your needs.  
Use the resources in AP Classroom to get you started.


1 Digital Set-up & Troubleshooting


2 Multiple-choice Questions


3 Free-response Questions


4 AP Literature Classroom Videos


5-10 Open Study Rooms


* Main Room--General Questions



Asynchronous - Digital Practice Exam

Due:

Free-Response on an excerpt from Fasting, Feasting by Anita Desai in Google Classroom

Free-Response on an excerpt from Fasting, Feasting by Anita Desai

The following excerpt is from Anita Desai’s novel Fasting, Feasting, published in 1999. In this passage, Arun, an exchange student from India, joins members of his American host family for an afternoon at the beach. Read the passage carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Desai uses literary elements and techniques to portray Arun’s complex experience.
In your response you should do the following:
Respond to the prompt with a thesis that presents a defensible interpretation.
Select and use evidence to support your line of reasoning.
Explain how the evidence supports your line of reasoning.
Use appropriate grammar and punctuation in communicating your argument.

Due:

5/21, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/21, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to use relevant and sufficient evidence to develop and support a line of reasoning (Skill 7.D) by discussing how evidence can not only be used to support a claim but also to inform the development of claims within an essay.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Do Now: 

Write just your thesis for the following literary argument prompt (from the 2015 AP Literature and Composition Exam):
 
In literary works, cruelty often functions as a crucial motivation or a major social or political factor. Select a novel, play, or
epic poem in which acts of cruelty are important to the theme. Then write a well-developed essay analyzing how cruelty functions in
the work as a whole and what the cruelty reveals about the perpetrator and/or victim.

Reread the following short fiction excerpt from Anita Desai's novel Fasting, Feasting.

Short Fiction Free-Response Prompt:
The following excerpt is from Anita Desai’s novel Fasting, Feasting, published in 1999. In this passage, Arun, an exchange student from India, joins members of his American host family for an afternoon at the beach. Read the passage carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Desai uses literary elements and techniques to portray Arun’s complex experience.

Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
What is the subject?
What is the question I must examine?
What might that answer to the question reveal about the theme?
What do I notice?  I notice...
What do I wonder?  I wonder...

https://jamboard.google.com/d/1i1KGkBu-wBcIqBxbbLZJlLFYdyUs3s6kRjC9QcRwo_g/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/4plock52r2?sui=13,7
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 7 (Short Fiction)/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/34317274

Review writing samples using scoring rubrics.

Due:

5/20, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/20, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to use relevant and sufficient evidence to develop and support a line of reasoning (Skill 7.D) by discussing how evidence can not only be used to support a claim but also to inform the development of claims within an essay.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Do Now: 


Write just your thesis for the following literary argument prompt (from the 2014 AP Literature and Composition Exam):
 
It has often been said that what we value can be determined only by what we sacrifice. Consider how this statement applies to
a character from a novel or play. Select a character that has deliberately sacrificed, surrendered, or forfeited something in a way that
highlights that character’s values. Then write a well-organized essay in which you analyze how the particular sacrifice illuminates the
character’s values and provides a deeper understanding of the meaning of the work as a whole.

Reeread the following short fiction excerpt from Anita Desai's novel Fasting, Feasting.

Short Fiction Free-Response Prompt:
The following excerpt is from Anita Desai’s novel Fasting, Feasting, published in 1999. In this passage, Arun, an exchange student from India, joins members of his American host family for an afternoon at the beach. Read the passage carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Desai uses literary elements and techniques to portray Arun’s complex experience.

Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
What is the subject?
What is the question I must examine?
What might that answer to the question reveal about the theme?
What do I notice?  I notice...
What do I wonder?  I wonder...

https://jamboard.google.com/d/1i1KGkBu-wBcIqBxbbLZJlLFYdyUs3s6kRjC9QcRwo_g/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/4plock52r2?sui=13,7
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 7 (Short Fiction)/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/34317274

Review writing samples using scoring rubrics.

Due:

5/19, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/19, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop commentary that connects textual evidence, line of reasoning, and thesis (Skill 7.C) by examining the distinguishing features of sophisticated literary arguments. 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: How do you define "sophistication"?  Give an example of "sophistication."



Reeread the following short fiction excerpt from Anita Desai's novel Fasting, Feasting.

Short Fiction Free-Response Prompt:
The following excerpt is from Anita Desai’s novel Fasting, Feasting, published in 1999. In this passage, Arun, an exchange student from India, joins members of his American host family for an afternoon at the beach. Read the passage carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Desai uses literary elements and techniques to portray Arun’s complex experience.

Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
What is the subject?
What is the question I must examine?
What might that answer to the question reveal about the theme?
What do I notice?  I notice...
What do I wonder?  I wonder...

https://jamboard.google.com/d/1i1KGkBu-wBcIqBxbbLZJlLFYdyUs3s6kRjC9QcRwo_g/edit?usp=sharing


AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/ywpcxoldau?sui=13,7
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 7 (Short Fiction)/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/34317274

Review writing samples using scoring rubrics.

Due:

5/18, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/18, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop commentary that connects textual evidence, line of reasoning, and thesis (Skill 7.C) by reviewing the meaning of "line of reasoning" and focusing on strategies to develop it throughout an essay.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer



Reeread the following short fiction excerpt from Anita Desai's novel Fasting, Feasting.

Short Fiction Free-Response Prompt:
The following excerpt is from Anita Desai’s novel Fasting, Feasting, published in 1999. In this passage, Arun, an exchange student from India, joins members of his American host family for an afternoon at the beach. Read the passage carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Desai uses literary elements and techniques to portray Arun’s complex experience.

Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
What is the subject?
What is the question I must examine?
What might that answer to the question reveal about the theme?
What do I notice?  I notice...
What do I wonder?  I wonder...

https://jamboard.google.com/d/1i1KGkBu-wBcIqBxbbLZJlLFYdyUs3s6kRjC9QcRwo_g/edit?usp=sharing


AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/1sisu05swb?sui=13,7
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 7 (Short Fiction)/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/34317274

Review writing samples using scoring rubrics.

Due:

5/14, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/14, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop a thesis that conveys a defensible claim and establishes a line of reasoning (Skill 7.B) by discussing elements of a strong thesis using samples written in response to Sarah Orne Jewett's short story "A White Heron."

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: What would you want to be the first to put on the moon?  Write in the Zoom chat box. 

Read the excerpt from Sarah Orne Jewett’s short story “A White Heron,” published in 1886. 

Short Fiction Free-Response Prompt:
The following excerpt is adapted from Sarah Orne Jewett’s short story “A White Heron,” published in 1886. In this passage, Jewett describes Sylvia’s experience climbing a tall tree. Read the passage carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Jewett uses literary elements and techniques to develop the young heroine’s adventure.
Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
What is the subject?
What is the question I must examine?
What might that answer to the question reveal about the theme?
What do I notice?  I notice...
What do I wonder?  I wonder...
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1KPfJs7C0bm7bwJNl3jj7LTyigZTyJPhjT80owaA0qI8/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/wuhfw7xo1f?sui=13,7
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 7 (Short Fiction)/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/34317274

Review writing samples using scoring rubrics.

Due:

5/12, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/12, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop textually substantiated arguments about interpretations of part or all of a text (Skill 7.B) by examining how to deconstruct a prompt in order to support the crafting of a defensible claim. 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer

Reread the following short fiction excerpt from Anita Desai's novel Fasting, Feasting.

Short Fiction Free-Response Prompt:
The following excerpt is from Anita Desai’s novel Fasting, Feasting, published in 1999. In this passage, Arun, an exchange student from India, joins members of his American host family for an afternoon at the beach. Read the passage carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Desai uses literary elements and techniques to portray Arun’s complex experience.


Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
What is the subject?
What is the question I must examine?
What might that answer to the question reveal about the theme?
What do I notice?  I notice...
What do I wonder?  I wonder...
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1i1KGkBu-wBcIqBxbbLZJlLFYdyUs3s6kRjC9QcRwo_g/edit?usp=sharing


AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/4t99bdmi1p?sui=13,7
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 7 (Short Fiction)/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/34317274


Review students' thesis statements using scoring rubrics.

Due:

5/11, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/11, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop textually substantiated arguments about interpretations of part or all of a text (Skill 7.B) by examining how to deconstruct a prompt in order to support the crafting of a defensible claim. 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer

Read the following short fiction excerpt from an 1852 novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne.
https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/apc/ap18-frq-english-literature.pdf

Short Fiction Free-Response Prompt:
Analyze how Hawthorne portrays the narrator's attitude towards Zenobia through the use of literary techniques.

Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
What is the subject?
What is the question I must examine?
What might that answer to the question reveal about the theme?
What do I notice?  I notice...
What do I wonder?  I wonder...
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1ENRAYjd5lXZah6nb63IRIxeMBtx3vmofGbYM22TPnLk/edit?usp=sharing


AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/4t99bdmi1p?sui=13,7
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 7 (Short Fiction)/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/34317274


The following excerpt is from Anita Desai’s novel Fasting, Feasting, published in 1999. In this passage, Arun, an exchange student from India, joins members of his American host family for an afternoon at the beach. Read the passage carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Desai uses literary elements and techniques to portray Arun’s complex experience.

Review students' thesis statements using scoring rubrics.

Due:

5/10, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/10, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop textually substantiated arguments about interpretations of part or all of a text (Skill 7.B) by examining how to deconstruct a prompt in order to support the crafting of a defensible claim. 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer

Read the following short fiction excerpt from an 1852 novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne.
https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/apc/ap18-frq-english-literature.pdf

Short Fiction Free-Response Prompt:
Analyze how Hawthorne portrays the narrator's attitude towards Zenobia through the use of literary techniques.

Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
What is the subject?
What is the question I must examine?
What might that answer to the question reveal about the theme?
What do I notice?  I notice...
What do I wonder?  I wonder...
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1ENRAYjd5lXZah6nb63IRIxeMBtx3vmofGbYM22TPnLk/edit?usp=sharing


AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/4t99bdmi1p?sui=13,7
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 7 (Short Fiction)/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/34317274


The following excerpt is from Anita Desai’s novel Fasting, Feasting, published in 1999. In this passage, Arun, an exchange student from India, joins members of his American host family for an afternoon at the beach. Read the passage carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Desai uses literary elements and techniques to portray Arun’s complex experience.

Review students' thesis statements using scoring rubrics.

Due:

May 3-7 Work Folder in Google Classroom

May 3-7 Work Folder

* Please note: For this week, you will follow an individualized action plan based on your academic progress.


Asynchronous Work (ALL students) 
* Due Fri, May 7th*

Watch/Review AP Classroom Video Lessons


Progress Checks:

Unit 8: MCQ


Link for students to take test: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/30619513


Unit 8: FRQ


Link for students to take test: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/30619504


Individualized Action Plan (more details will be given in class):

Attend specified virtual class meetings to receive NX coaching and complete previous course assignments.
Attend specified virtual class meetings to make up current coursework, which includes completing missing or incomplete assignments in Google classroom. 
Peer-tutor 
Work on asynchronous assignments

Due:

4/30, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/30, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to...
1. write a literary analysis essay in response to a poetry free-response prompt. 
2. use the AP Literature scoring rubrics to evaluate writing samples.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: "Waterfall" Response -- Write in the Zoom chat box, but do not submit your response until I tell you to.  
What is one word that describes how you are feeling today?  


Mini-Lesson: Using Scoring Rubrics to Evaluate Writing




Reading: "A Story," a poem by Li-Young Lee



Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
Who or what is the subject of the poem?
What are the actions of the subject?
Why do you think the subject behaves in this manner?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1n7hzj4EANho7hhfHm30F5LeFhohddjn9UJU3gv7WBXA/edit?usp=sharing





Review AP Classroom Daily Video Lessons



Assessment: Unit 8/Skills 7.B, C, D, E Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33831424


Google Classroom Assignment Link: https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYzMDU0MjEwMTIx/a/MzMxMjAwMzM2Njk2/details

In Li-Young Lee’s poem “A Story,” published in 1990, the speaker describes the relationship between a father and son. Read the poem carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Lee uses literary elements and techniques to convey the complex relationship of the father and son.
In your response you should do the following:
Respond to the prompt with a thesis that presents a defensible interpretation.
Select and use evidence to support your line of reasoning.
Explain how the evidence supports your line of reasoning.
Use appropriate grammar and punctuation in communicating your argument



Peer-Critiquing: What score would you give the essay for its thesis/evidence and commentary/sophistication?  Why?

Due:

4/29, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/29, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to...
1. write a literary analysis essay in response to a poetry free-response prompt. 
2. use the AP Literature scoring rubrics to evaluate writing samples.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: "Waterfall" Response -- Write in the Zoom chat box, but do not submit your response until I tell you to.  
What is one word that describes how you are feeling today?  


Mini-Lesson: Using Scoring Rubrics to Evaluate Writing




Reading: "A Story," a poem by Li-Young Lee



Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
Who or what is the subject of the poem?
What are the actions of the subject?
Why do you think the subject behaves in this manner?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1n7hzj4EANho7hhfHm30F5LeFhohddjn9UJU3gv7WBXA/edit?usp=sharing





Review AP Classroom Daily Video Lessons



Assessment: Unit 8/Skills 7.B, C, D, E Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33831424


Google Classroom Assignment Link: https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYzMDU0MjEwMTIx/a/MzMxMjAwMzM2Njk2/details

In Li-Young Lee’s poem “A Story,” published in 1990, the speaker describes the relationship between a father and son. Read the poem carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Lee uses literary elements and techniques to convey the complex relationship of the father and son.
In your response you should do the following:
Respond to the prompt with a thesis that presents a defensible interpretation.
Select and use evidence to support your line of reasoning.
Explain how the evidence supports your line of reasoning.
Use appropriate grammar and punctuation in communicating your argument



Peer-Critiquing: What score would you give the essay for its thesis/evidence and commentary/sophistication?  Why?

Due:

4/28, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/28, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to...
1. write a literary analysis essay in response to a poetry free-response prompt. 
2. use the AP Literature scoring rubrics to evaluate writing samples.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: What is your favorite ice cream flavor?  Write in the Zoom chat box.



Mini-Lesson: Using Scoring Rubrics to Evaluate Writing




Reading: "A Story," a poem by Li-Young Lee



Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
Who or what is the subject of the poem?
What are the actions of the subject?
Why do you think the subject behaves in this manner?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1n7hzj4EANho7hhfHm30F5LeFhohddjn9UJU3gv7WBXA/edit?usp=sharing





Review AP Classroom Daily Video Lessons



Assessment: Unit 8/Skills 7.B, C, D, E Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33831424


Google Classroom Assignment Link: https://classroom.google.com/c/MTYzMDU0MjEwMTIx/a/MzMxMjAwMzM2Njk2/details

In Li-Young Lee’s poem “A Story,” published in 1990, the speaker describes the relationship between a father and son. Read the poem carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Lee uses literary elements and techniques to convey the complex relationship of the father and son.
In your response you should do the following:
Respond to the prompt with a thesis that presents a defensible interpretation.
Select and use evidence to support your line of reasoning.
Explain how the evidence supports your line of reasoning.
Use appropriate grammar and punctuation in communicating your argument



Peer-Critiquing: What score would you give the essay for its thesis/evidence and commentary/sophistication?  Why?

Due:

Free-Response on

Free-Response on "A Story"

In Li-Young Lee’s poem “A Story,” published in 1990, the speaker describes the relationship between a father and son. Read the poem carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Lee uses literary elements and techniques to convey the complex relationship of the father and son.
In your response you should do the following:
Respond to the prompt with a thesis that presents a defensible interpretation.
Select and use evidence to support your line of reasoning.
Explain how the evidence supports your line of reasoning.
Use appropriate grammar and punctuation in communicating your argument.

Due:

4/26-4/27 Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/26-4/27 Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to write a literary analysis essay in response to a poetry free-response prompt.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: What is the toughest challenge that you have ever had to overcome?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

Reread P.K. Page's 1943 poem "The Landlady."
https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/apc/ap19-frq-english-literature.pdf


Poetry Free-Response Prompt:
Carefully read P. K. Page’s 1943 poem “The Landlady.” Then, in a well-organized essay, analyze the speaker’s complex portrayal of the landlady. You may wish to consider such elements as imagery, selection of detail, and tone. 


Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
Who or what is the subject of the poem?
What are the actions of the subject?
Why do you think the subject behaves in this manner?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1n8xEYSaXaBOGegFY2WkFfv9q_JaDWlFGJVGlx1tcio0/edit?usp=sharing

Review AP Classroom Daily Video Lessons

Assessment: Unit 8/Skills 7.B, C, D, E Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33831424


In Li-Young Lee’s poem “A Story,” published in 1990, the speaker describes the relationship between a father and son. Read the poem carefully. Then, in a well-written essay, analyze how Lee uses literary elements and techniques to convey the complex relationship of the father and son.
In your response you should do the following:
Respond to the prompt with a thesis that presents a defensible interpretation.
Select and use evidence to support your line of reasoning.
Explain how the evidence supports your line of reasoning.
Use appropriate grammar and punctuation in communicating your argument.

Due:

4/23, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/23, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to demonstrate control over the elements of composition to communicate clearly (Skill: 7.E) by examining the use of direct and indirect text evidence in essay writing. 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: What is one of your favorite motivational quotes?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

Reread P.K. Page's 1943 poem "The Landlady."
https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/apc/ap19-frq-english-literature.pdf


Poetry Free-Response Prompt:
Carefully read P. K. Page’s 1943 poem “The Landlady.” Then, in a well-organized essay, analyze the speaker’s complex portrayal of the landlady. You may wish to consider such elements as imagery, selection of detail, and tone. 


Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
Who or what is the subject of the poem?
What are the actions of the subject?
Why do you think the subject behaves in this manner?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1n8xEYSaXaBOGegFY2WkFfv9q_JaDWlFGJVGlx1tcio0/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/rpsc0vmpb7?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 8/Skills 7.B, C, D, E Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33831424


Review students' writing progress.

Due:

4/22, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/22, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop textually substantiated arguments about interpretations of a text by selecting and using relevant and sufficient evidence to both develop and support a line of reasoning (Skill: 7.D). 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: What is something that really creeps you out?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

Reread P.K. Page's 1943 poem "The Landlady."
https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/apc/ap19-frq-english-literature.pdf


Poetry Free-Response Prompt:
Carefully read P. K. Page’s 1943 poem “The Landlady.” Then, in a well-organized essay, analyze the speaker’s complex portrayal of the landlady. You may wish to consider such elements as imagery, selection of detail, and tone. 


Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
Who or what is the subject of the poem?
What are the actions of the subject?
Why do you think the subject behaves in this manner?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1n8xEYSaXaBOGegFY2WkFfv9q_JaDWlFGJVGlx1tcio0/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/l3i2uj2usm?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 8/Skills 7.B, C, D, E Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33831424


Review students' use of evidence to support a line of reasoning.

Due:

4/21, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/21, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop textually substantiated arguments about interpretations of a text by developing commentary that connects textual evidence, line of reasoning, and thesis (skill: 7.C). 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: If you were to make a movie about your life, what genre would it be (action, comedy, drama, mystery, thriller, documentary, musical, etc.)?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

Reread P.K. Page's 1943 poem "The Landlady."
https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/apc/ap19-frq-english-literature.pdf


Poetry Free-Response Prompt:
Carefully read P. K. Page’s 1943 poem “The Landlady.” Then, in a well-organized essay, analyze the speaker’s
complex portrayal of the landlady. You may wish to consider such elements as imagery, selection of detail, and tone. 

Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
Who or what is the subject of the poem?
What are the actions of the subject?
Why do you think the subject behaves in this manner?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1n8xEYSaXaBOGegFY2WkFfv9q_JaDWlFGJVGlx1tcio0/edit?usp=sharing


AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/jk6uha70lg?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.


Practice: Unit 8/Skill 7.C Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33872690

Review students' written responses using scoring rubrics.

Due:

4/20, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/20, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop textually substantiated arguments about interpretations of part or all of a text (Skill 7.B) by examining how effective thesis statements explicitly establish a line of reasoning. 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: What is a hidden talent that you (might) have?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

Read P.K. Page's 1943 poem "The Landlady."
https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/apc/ap19-frq-english-literature.pdf


Poetry Free-Response Prompt:
Carefully read P. K. Page’s 1943 poem “The Landlady.” Then, in a well-organized essay, analyze the speaker’s
complex portrayal of the landlady. You may wish to consider such elements as imagery, selection of detail, and tone. 


Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
Who or what is the subject of the poem?
What are the actions of the subject?
Why do you think the subject behaves in this manner?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1n8xEYSaXaBOGegFY2WkFfv9q_JaDWlFGJVGlx1tcio0/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/t245lon6pd?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 8/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33831424



Review students' thesis statements using scoring rubrics.

Due:

4/19, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/19, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop textually substantiated arguments about interpretations of part or all of a text (Skill 7.B) by examining how effective thesis statements explicitly establish a line of reasoning. 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: What is one cause that you are really passionate about?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

Read P.K. Page's 1943 poem "The Landlady."
https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/apc/ap19-frq-english-literature.pdf


Poetry Free-Response Prompt:
Carefully read P. K. Page’s 1943 poem “The Landlady.” Then, in a well-organized essay, analyze the speaker’s
complex portrayal of the landlady. You may wish to consider such elements as imagery, selection of detail, and tone. 


Pre-writing/Brainstorming Questions:
Who or what is the subject of the poem?
What are the actions of the subject?
Why do you think the subject behaves in this manner?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1n8xEYSaXaBOGegFY2WkFfv9q_JaDWlFGJVGlx1tcio0/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/t245lon6pd?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 8/Skill 7.B Free-Response Question
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33831424



Review students' thesis statements using scoring rubrics.

Due:

4/16, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/16, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and explain the function of a metaphor (Skill 6.B) by reviewing a type of extended metaphor called a conceit and discussing its effectiveness in poetry.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: If you could be reincarnated as anything you want, what would it be?  Why?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

Read and annotate the poem "Because I could not stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson.

Conceit -- an extended metaphor with a complex logic that governs a poetic passage or entire poem. It usually sets up an analogy between one entity's spiritual or metaphysical qualities and an object in the physical world.

What is the subject?
What is the subject being compared to?
Why is the subject being compared to this other object or entity?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1lfvhWVrYI6MVynSK4y9_4dBmYwEPGwTNNkpOu6sk9_g/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/4mcy9625ik?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 8/Skill 6.B Topic Questions
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33695923Review answers.

Due:

4/14-4/15 Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/14-4/15 Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and explain the function of a metaphor (Skill 6.B) by reviewing a type of extended metaphor called a conceit and discussing its effectiveness in poetry.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: If you could be reincarnated as anything you want, what would it be?  Why?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

Read and annotate the poem "Because I could not stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson.

Conceit -- an extended metaphor with a complex logic that governs a poetic passage or entire poem. It usually sets up an analogy between one entity's spiritual or metaphysical qualities and an object in the physical world.

What is the subject?
What is the subject being compared to?
Why is the subject being compared to this other object or entity?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1lfvhWVrYI6MVynSK4y9_4dBmYwEPGwTNNkpOu6sk9_g/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/4mcy9625ik?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 8/Skill 6.B Topic Questions
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33695923Review answers.

Due:

4/12-4/13 Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/12-4/13 Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and explain the function of a metaphor (Skill 6.B) by reviewing a type of extended metaphor called a conceit and discussing its effectiveness in poetry.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: If you could be any animal, what would you be and why?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1Q68Bsypj-1tukae0lcMHftfUWL_2wuiMTJKnz-Xefd0/edit?usp=sharing

Read and annotate the poem "The Sun Rising" by John Donne.


Conceit -- an extended metaphor with a complex logic that governs a poetic passage or entire poem. It usually sets up an analogy between one entity's spiritual or metaphysical qualities and an object in the physical world.


What is the subject?
What is the subject being compared to?
Why is the subject being compared to this other object or entity?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1lfvhWVrYI6MVynSK4y9_4dBmYwEPGwTNNkpOu6sk9_g/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/4mcy9625ik?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 8/Skill 6.B Topic Questions
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33695923Review answers.

Due:

4/9, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/9, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and explain the function of a symbol (Skill 5.C) by discussing how symbols may be used to suggest the speaker's particular attitude or perspective in "O Captain!  My Captain!" by Walt Whitman.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: Post an emoji or an image to represent how you are feeling right now.
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1uLVw79SrEhUTXu-1xrWMratPxWO9QzgJOuIdV8tKQOg/edit?usp=sharing


Read and annotate the poem "O Captain!  My Captain!" by Walt Whitman.


What is the subject?
Who is the speaker?
What is the situation?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1pC6Pn3niyNTuvTwrcTGKUafhKQ-i9gGpjKGgQ6L6cZk/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/rdfktmd34p?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 8/Skill 5.C Topic Questions
 https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assignments/33670186
Review answers.

Due:

4/8, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/8, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text (Skill 5.B) by discussing how ambiguity in Emily Dickinson's poem "I Felt a Funeral, in my Brain" illustrates the complexity of the text by allowing for multiple interpretations.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: What image do you see?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1lhHUls6eghRMpPk5_QeEp2zeSLggLg7wPvYvssDPgEE/edit?usp=sharing

Read and annotate the poem "I Felt a Funeral, in my Brain" by Emily Dickinson.


What is your interpretation of the poem?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1hgaHC2el6hKQN8QFK6M4z5aAQqkrv1c6wp4dq1pqEaQ/edit?usp=sharing

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: 
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/jijwh6695d?sui=13,8
- Use the Zoom chat to share your insights and ask questions.

Practice: Unit 8 5.B Topic Questions

Review answers.

Due:

4/5, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/5, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of plot and structure in a text by examining the extended imagery and meaningful punctuation in Thomas Hardy's poem "The Convergence of the Twain" (Skill 3.C)

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: What was the best part of your spring break?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

AP Classroom Daily Video Lesson: https:// .collegeboard.org/d/uc3c2fbp26?sui=13,8


Practice: Unit 8 3.C Topic Questions

Due:

3/26, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/26, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to write claims explaining the function of various elements of poetry in Mending Wall" by Robert Frost.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer: What is your favorite poetic writing strategy? Why? Give an example of how you would use it in your own original poem.

About the Author Robert Frost https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/robert-frost

Read and annotate the poem "Mending Wall."

Poem: "Mending Wall"
copy of poem-- https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44266/mending-wall
audio-- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uB_iD1ZCVG0

Prompt: Carefully read Robert Frost's 1914 poem "Mending Wall." Then in a well-organized essay, analyze how the poet portrays the complex relationship between the next door neighbors.

Class Discussion: Analyzing the function of various elements of poetry in "Mending Wall"
https://share.nearpod.com/7AMMHePrVeb

Big Ideas:
1. Character
2. Setting
3. Structure
4. Narration
5. Figurative Language

Terms:
Blank Verse: verse without rhyme
Iambic Pentameter: a line of verse with five metrical feet, each consisting of one short (or unstressed) syllable followed by one long (or stressed) syllable

Waterfall Claims: In the Zoom chat, write your claim explaining the function of each poetic element of "Mending Wall." (Wait for my signal before submitting your response.)

Due:

3/25, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/25, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to compose a literary claim and explain the function of various elements of poetry in "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Please complete:
Testing Preference Google form--
https://forms.gle/qLPkcz5pzPKLrb2U7

Poem: "We Real Cool" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0USvSvhue70&t=275s
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/28112/we-real-cool

About the Author Gwendolyn Brooks https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/gwendolyn-brooks

Prompt: Carefully read Gwendolyn Brooks' 1963 poem "We Real Cool." Then in a well-organized essay, analyze how the poet portrays the Pool Players' attitude about life.

Assignment: Read the poem "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.
Using a Google slide, prepare a 10-minute presentation discussing your claim.

Class Discussion: Analyzing the function of various elements of poetry in "We Real Cool"
Nearpod https://share.nearpod.com/DInIKbtsubb

Big Ideas:
1. Character
2. Setting
3. Structure
4. Narration
5. Figurative Language

Self-Evaluation: review of claim using rubrics

Due:

3/24, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/24, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to compose a literary claim and explain the function of various elements of poetry in "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer: If you could have any superpower, what would you choose and why? Write in the Zoom chat box.

Poem: "We Real Cool" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0USvSvhue70&t=275s

About the Author Gwendolyn Brooks https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/gwendolyn-brooks

Prompt: Carefully read Gwendolyn Brooks' 1963 poem "We Real Cool." Then in a well-organized essay, analyze how the poet portrays the Pool Players' attitude about life.

Big Ideas:
1. Character
2. Setting
3. Structure
4. Narration
5. Figurative Language

Assignment: Read the poem "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.
Using a Google slide, prepare a 10-minute presentation discussing your claim.

Due:

3/23, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/23, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to compose a literary claim and explain the function of various elements of poetry in "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer: If you could have any superpower, what would you choose and why? Write in the Zoom chat box.

Poem: "We Real Cool" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0USvSvhue70&t=275s

About the Author Gwendolyn Brooks https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/gwendolyn-brooks

Prompt: Carefully read Gwendolyn Brooks' 1963 poem "We Real Cool." Then in a well-organized essay, analyze how the poet portrays the Pool Players' attitude about life.

Big Ideas:
1. Character
2. Setting
3. Structure
4. Narration
5. Figurative Language

Assignment: Read the poem "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.
Using a Google slide, prepare a 10-minute presentation discussing your claim.

Due:

3/22, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/22, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to compose a literary claim and explain the function of various elements of poetry in "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Poem: "We Real Cool" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0USvSvhue70&t=275s

About the Author Gwendolyn Brooks https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/gwendolyn-brooks

Prompt: Carefully read Gwendolyn Brooks' 1963 poem "We Real Cool." Then in a well-organized essay, analyze how the poet portrays the Pool Players' attitude about life.

Big Ideas:
1. Character
2. Setting
3. Structure
4. Narration
5. Figurative Language

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the poem "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.
Using a Google slide, prepare a 10-minute presentation discussing your claim.

Due:

3/19, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/19, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to compose a literary claim and explain the function of various elements of poetry in "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Poem: "We Real Cool" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0USvSvhue70&t=275s

About the Author Gwendolyn Brooks https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/gwendolyn-brooks

Prompt: Carefully read Gwendolyn Brooks' 1963 poem "We Real Cool." Then in a well-organized essay, analyze how the poet portrays the Pool Players' attitude about life.

Big Ideas:
1. Character
2. Setting
3. Structure
4. Narration
5. Figurative Language

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the poem "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.
Prepare a 10-minute presentation discussing your claim.

Due:

3/18, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/18, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to compose a literary claim and explain the function of various elements of poetry in "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Poem: "We Real Cool" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0USvSvhue70&t=275s

About the Author Gwendolyn Brooks https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/gwendolyn-brooks

Carefully read Gwendolyn Brooks' 1963 poem "We Real Cool." Then in a well-organized essay, analyze how the poet portrays the Pool Players' attitude about life.

Poetry Skill Categories/Skills:

1. Explain the function of character.
1.A Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character’s perspective, and that character’s motives.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.D. Explain the function of contrasts within a text.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.B Explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text.


6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.B. Identify and explain the function of a metaphor.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the poem "We Real Cool" by Audre Lorde.
Prepare a 10-minute presentation discussing your claim.

Due:

3/17, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/17, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and explain the function of a metaphor in "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Text: "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.

* Identify an example of the literary element in the text. Where in the text do you see the literary element being used?
* Discuss the purpose of the literary element. What purpose does the literary element have in the text?
* Compose a claim about how the author uses the literary element to convey a central idea of the text. How does the author use the literary element to convey a central idea?

2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill, using the poem "From the House of Yemanja."
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)

Poetry Skill Categories/Skills:

1. Explain the function of character.
1.A Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character’s perspective, and that character’s motives.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/8j17pcqvyc?sui=13,2
Team Members: Shanice, Alexandra, Cassandra, Sean

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.D. Explain the function of contrasts within a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/d397niosp1?sui=13,8
Team Members: Uwanique, Malika, Raul

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.B Explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/jijwh6695d?sui=13,8
Team Members: Jassica, Matthew, Saskia

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.B. Identify and explain the function of a metaphor.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/r0ur5qqgat?sui=13,5
Team Members: Rufson, Zoad, Raeq, Antione

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

3/16, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/16, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of specific words and phrases in "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Text: "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.

* Identify an example of the literary element in the text. Where in the text do you see the literary element being used?
* Discuss the purpose of the literary element. What purpose does the literary element have in the text?
* Compose a claim about how the author uses the literary element to convey a central idea of the text. How does the author use the literary element to convey a central idea?

2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill, using the poem "From the House of Yemanja."
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)

Poetry Skill Categories/Skills:

1. Explain the function of character.
1.A Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character’s perspective, and that character’s motives.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/8j17pcqvyc?sui=13,2
Team Members: Shanice, Alexandra, Cassandra, Sean

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.D. Explain the function of contrasts within a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/d397niosp1?sui=13,8
Team Members: Uwanique, Malika, Raul

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.B Explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/jijwh6695d?sui=13,8
Team Members: Jassica, Matthew, Saskia

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.B. Identify and explain the function of a metaphor.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/r0ur5qqgat?sui=13,5
Team Members: Rufson, Zoad, Raeq, Antione

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

3/15, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/15, Mon. Work Folder

Poetry Skills M/C Quiz (8 questions)

apcentral.collegeboard.org

Due:

3/12, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/12, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of contrasts in "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Text: "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.

* Identify an example of the literary element in the text. Where in the text do you see the literary element being used?
* Discuss the purpose of the literary element. What purpose does the literary element have in the text?
* Compose a claim about how the author uses the literary element to convey a central idea of the text. How does the author use the literary element to convey a central idea?

2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill, using the poem "From the House of Yemanja."
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)

Poetry Skill Categories/Skills:

1. Explain the function of character.
1.A Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character’s perspective, and that character’s motives.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/8j17pcqvyc?sui=13,2
Team Members: Shanice, Alexandra, Cassandra, Sean

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.D. Explain the function of contrasts within a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/d397niosp1?sui=13,8
Team Members: Uwanique, Malika, Raul

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.B Explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/jijwh6695d?sui=13,8
Team Members: Jassica, Matthew, Saskia

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.B. Identify and explain the function of a metaphor.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/r0ur5qqgat?sui=13,5
Team Members: Rufson, Zoad, Raeq, Antione

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

3/11, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/11, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and describe what specific details reveal about a character, that character's perspective, and that character's motives in "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Text: "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.

* Identify an example of the literary element in the text. Where in the text do you see the literary element being used?
* Discuss the purpose of the literary element. What purpose does the literary element have in the text?
* Compose a claim about how the author uses the literary element to convey a central idea of the text. How does the author use the literary element to convey a central idea?

2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill, using the poem "From the House of Yemanja."
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)

Poetry Skill Categories/Skills:

1. Explain the function of character.
1.A Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character’s perspective, and that character’s motives.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/8j17pcqvyc?sui=13,2
Team Members: Shanice, Alexandra, Cassandra, Sean

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.D. Explain the function of contrasts within a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/d397niosp1?sui=13,8
Team Members: Uwanique, Malika, Raul

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.B Explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/jijwh6695d?sui=13,8
Team Members: Jassica, Matthew, Saskia

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.B. Identify and explain the function of a metaphor.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/r0ur5qqgat?sui=13,5
Team Members: Rufson, Zoad, Raeq, Antione

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

3/10, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/10, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of various elements of poetry in "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer: Describe any challenge that you have faced using a warfare metaphor. Write in the Zoom chat box.

Text: "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.

* Identify an example of the literary element in the text. Where in the text do you see the literary element being used?
* Discuss the purpose of the literary element. What purpose does the literary element have in the text?
* Compose a claim about how the author uses the literary element to convey a central idea of the text. How does the author use the literary element to convey a central idea?

2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill, using the poem "From the House of Yemanja."
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)

Poetry Skill Categories/Skills:

1. Explain the function of character.
1.A Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character’s perspective, and that character’s motives.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/8j17pcqvyc?sui=13,2
Team Members: Shanice, Alexandra, Cassandra, Sean

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.D. Explain the function of contrasts within a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/d397niosp1?sui=13,8
Team Members: Uwanique, Malika, Raul

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.B Explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/jijwh6695d?sui=13,8
Team Members: Jassica, Matthew, Saskia

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.B. Identify and explain the function of a metaphor.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/r0ur5qqgat?sui=13,5
Team Members: Rufson, Zoad, Raeq, Antione

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the poem "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.

Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

3/9, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/9, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of various elements of poetry in "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer: Describe your day using a nature metaphor. Write in the Zoom chat box.

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill, using the poem "From the House of Yemanja."
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)

Poetry Skill Categories/Skills:

1. Explain the function of character.
1.A Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character’s perspective, and that character’s motives.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/8j17pcqvyc?sui=13,2
Team Members: Shanice, Alexandra, Cassandra, Sean

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.D. Explain the function of contrasts within a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/d397niosp1?sui=13,8
Team Members: Uwanique, Malika, Raul

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.B Explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/jijwh6695d?sui=13,8
Team Members: Jassica, Matthew, Saskia

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.B. Identify and explain the function of a metaphor.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/r0ur5qqgat?sui=13,5
Team Members: Rufson, Zoad, Raeq, Antione

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the poem "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.

Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

3/8, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/8, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of various elements of poetry in "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer: Describe your mood using a weather metaphor. Write in the Zoom chat box.

About the Author Audre Lorde https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/audre-lorde

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill, using the poem "From the House of Yemanja."
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)

Poetry Skill Categories/Skills:

1. Explain the function of character.
1.A Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character’s perspective, and that character’s motives.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/8j17pcqvyc?sui=13,2
Team Members: Shanice, Alexandra, Cassandra, Sean

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.D. Explain the function of contrasts within a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/d397niosp1?sui=13,8
Team Members: Uwanique, Malika, Raul

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.B Explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/jijwh6695d?sui=13,8
Team Members: Jassica, Matthew, Saskia

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.B. Identify and explain the function of a metaphor.
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/r0ur5qqgat?sui=13,5
Team Members: Rufson, Zoad, Raeq, Antione

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the poem "From the House of Yemanja" by Audre Lorde.
Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

......................................................................................................................................................................................................
Sample Lesson Plan/Agenda:

Learning Objective: Students will be able to describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in Lucy's relationship with Mariah.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: How is your ancestral culture similar to or different from today's American culture? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Character Relationships
AP Classroom video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/v6fj3qomur?sui=13,7

3. Reading: Excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid

4. Discussion

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/5, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/5, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of a symbol in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1799MYghYBPrrJsNKyjvXvquEo-ofjvT3QbsxPLzN9mE/edit?usp=sharing

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Preparation/In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson (as modeled) to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)


Unit 7: Short Fiction III Skill Categories

1. Explain the function of character.
1.B Explain the function of a character changing or remaining unchanged.
1.D Describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in characters’ relationships with one another.

2. Explain the function of setting.
2.B Explain the function of setting in a narrative.
2.C Describe the relationship between a character and a setting.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.A Identify and describe how plot orders events in a narrative.
3.B Explain the function of a particular sequence of events in a plot.

4. Explain the function of the narrator or speaker.
4.D Explain how a narrator’s reliability affects a narrative.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.C Identify and explain the function of a symbol.
5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.A Identify and explain the function of a simile.
6.C Identify and explain the function of personification.

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

3/4, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/4, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the function of personification in the short fiction in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

*Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook because there will be questions asked at the end of the lesson (Time to Climb).

https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/home?apd=f5f543v1sd

Agenda:

Energizer = What examples of personification do you hear in Super Bass by Nicki Minaj
Mini-Lesson = Identify and explain the function of personification
Analyzing examples of personification in Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid

Discussion = How does personification in the novel enhances the excerpt?
What is the purpose of personification?

Reading = Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid

Exit Ticket = Time to climb

In the novel Lucy, by Jamaica Kinkaid the author uses personification to convey the idea that Lucy and Mariah have very different perspectives on how they view spring due to their upbringing

................................

Preparation/In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson (as modeled) to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)


Unit 7: Short Fiction III Skill Categories

1. Explain the function of character.
1.B Explain the function of a character changing or remaining unchanged.
1.D Describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in characters’ relationships with one another.

2. Explain the function of setting.
2.B Explain the function of setting in a narrative.
2.C Describe the relationship between a character and a setting.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.A Identify and describe how plot orders events in a narrative.
3.B Explain the function of a particular sequence of events in a plot.

4. Explain the function of the narrator or speaker.
4.D Explain how a narrator’s reliability affects a narrative.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.C Identify and explain the function of a symbol.
5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.A Identify and explain the function of a simile.
6.C Identify and explain the function of personification.

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincai

Due:

3/3, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/3, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of setting in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Preparation/In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson (as modeled) to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)


Unit 7: Short Fiction III Skill Categories

1. Explain the function of character.
1.B Explain the function of a character changing or remaining unchanged.
1.D Describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in characters’ relationships with one another.

2. Explain the function of setting.
2.B Explain the function of setting in a narrative.
2.C Describe the relationship between a character and a setting.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.A Identify and describe how plot orders events in a narrative.
3.B Explain the function of a particular sequence of events in a plot.

4. Explain the function of the narrator or speaker.
4.D Explain how a narrator’s reliability affects a narrative.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.C Identify and explain the function of a symbol.
5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.A Identify and explain the function of a simile.
6.C Identify and explain the function of personification.

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

3/2, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/2, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of setting in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

Preparation/In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson (as modeled) to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)


Unit 7: Short Fiction III Skill Categories

1. Explain the function of character.
1.B Explain the function of a character changing or remaining unchanged.
1.D Describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in characters’ relationships with one another.

2. Explain the function of setting.
2.B Explain the function of setting in a narrative.
2.C Describe the relationship between a character and a setting.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.A Identify and describe how plot orders events in a narrative.
3.B Explain the function of a particular sequence of events in a plot.

4. Explain the function of the narrator or speaker.
4.D Explain how a narrator’s reliability affects a narrative.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.C Identify and explain the function of a symbol.
5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.A Identify and explain the function of a simile.
6.C Identify and explain the function of personification.

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

3/1, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/1, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to compose claims about how various literary elements are used in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: Use figurative language to describe how your day is going so far.
Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Reading: Excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Unit 3 Progress Check: FRQ https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assessments?quizId=590387

3. Discussion:
For each literary element, write a claim about the function (purpose, role) that it has in the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel.
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1zbMbWa3wpAR6v5oJtPtFlHnoUHpX27EBEDiQq2GgGiI/edit?usp=sharing

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.


.................................................

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of various elements of short fiction in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)


Unit 7: Short Fiction III Skill Categories

1. Explain the function of character.
1.B Explain the function of a character changing or remaining unchanged.
1.D Describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in characters’ relationships with one another.

2. Explain the function of setting.
2.B Explain the function of setting in a narrative.
2.C Describe the relationship between a character and a setting.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.A Identify and describe how plot orders events in a narrative.
3.B Explain the function of a particular sequence of events in a plot.

4. Explain the function of the narrator or speaker.
4.D Explain how a narrator’s reliability affects a narrative.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.C Identify and explain the function of a symbol.
5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.A Identify and explain the function of a simile.
6.C Identify and explain the function of personification.

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

2/26, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/26, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in Lucy's relationship with Mariah.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: How is your ancestral culture similar to or different from today's American culture? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Character Relationships
AP Classroom video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/0c1qsuybji?sui=13,7

3. Reading: Excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Unit 3 Progress Check: FRQ https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assessments?quizId=590387

4. Discussion:
https://jamboard.google.com/d/13Z_MGjYc0g4tEdj-d0oPsRRxfKVKUrmVMJDpQCoYAnU/edit?usp=sharing
1. What are some modifiers/verbs that the narrator uses to describe her own actions?
2. What are some modifiers/verbs that the narrator uses to describe Mariah's actions?
3. What conclusions can you draw about Lucy's attitude towards Mariah?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.




Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of various elements of short fiction in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)


Unit 7: Short Fiction III Skill Categories

1. Explain the function of character.
1.B Explain the function of a character changing or remaining unchanged.
1.D Describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in characters’ relationships with one another.

2. Explain the function of setting.
2.B Explain the function of setting in a narrative.
2.C Describe the relationship between a character and a setting.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.A Identify and describe how plot orders events in a narrative.
3.B Explain the function of a particular sequence of events in a plot.

4. Explain the function of the narrator or speaker.
4.D Explain how a narrator’s reliability affects a narrative.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.C Identify and explain the function of a symbol.
5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.A Identify and explain the function of a simile.
6.C Identify and explain the function of personification.

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

Due:

2/24, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/24, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of various elements of short fiction in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)


Unit 7: Short Fiction III Skill Categories

1. Explain the function of character.
1.B Explain the function of a character changing or remaining unchanged.
1.D Describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in characters’ relationships with one another.

2. Explain the function of setting.
2.B Explain the function of setting in a narrative.
2.C Describe the relationship between a character and a setting.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.A Identify and describe how plot orders events in a narrative.
3.B Explain the function of a particular sequence of events in a plot.

4. Explain the function of the narrator or speaker.
4.D Explain how a narrator’s reliability affects a narrative.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.C Identify and explain the function of a symbol.
5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.A Identify and explain the function of a simile.
6.C Identify and explain the function of personification.

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

.................................................................................................................................................................................................
Sample Lesson Plan/Agenda:

Learning Objective: Students will be able to describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in Lucy's relationship with Mariah.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: How is your ancestral culture similar to or different from today's American culture? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Character Relationships
AP Classroom video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/v6fj3qomur?sui=13,7

3. Reading: Excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Unit 3 Progress Check: FRQ https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assessments?quizId=590387

4. Discussion

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/23, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/23, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of various elements of short fiction in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)


Unit 7: Short Fiction III Skill Categories

1. Explain the function of character.
1.B Explain the function of a character changing or remaining unchanged.
1.D Describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in characters’ relationships with one another.

2. Explain the function of setting.
2.B Explain the function of setting in a narrative.
2.C Describe the relationship between a character and a setting.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.A Identify and describe how plot orders events in a narrative.
3.B Explain the function of a particular sequence of events in a plot.

4. Explain the function of the narrator or speaker.
4.D Explain how a narrator’s reliability affects a narrative.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.C Identify and explain the function of a symbol.
5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.A Identify and explain the function of a simile.
6.C Identify and explain the function of personification.

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

.................................................................................................................................................................................................
Sample Lesson Plan/Agenda:

Learning Objective: Students will be able to describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in Lucy's relationship with Mariah.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: How is your ancestral culture similar to or different from today's American culture? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Character Relationships
AP Classroom video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/v6fj3qomur?sui=13,7

3. Reading: Excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Unit 3 Progress Check: FRQ https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assessments?quizId=590387

4. Discussion

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/22, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/22, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the function of various elements of short fiction in an excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Energizer

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill.
2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)


Unit 7: Short Fiction III Skill Categories

1. Explain the function of character.
1.B Explain the function of a character changing or remaining unchanged.
1.D Describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in characters’ relationships with one another.

2. Explain the function of setting.
2.B Explain the function of setting in a narrative.
2.C Describe the relationship between a character and a setting.

3. Explain the function of plot and structure.
3.A Identify and describe how plot orders events in a narrative.
3.B Explain the function of a particular sequence of events in a plot.

4. Explain the function of the narrator or speaker.
4.D Explain how a narrator’s reliability affects a narrative.

5. Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.
5.C Identify and explain the function of a symbol.
5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.

6. Explain the function of comparison.
6.A Identify and explain the function of a simile.
6.C Identify and explain the function of personification.

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.

Asynchronous Assignment: Read the excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.

......................................................................................................................................................................................................
Sample Lesson Plan/Agenda:

Learning Objective: Students will be able to describe how textual details reveal nuances and complexities in Lucy's relationship with Mariah.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: How is your ancestral culture similar to or different from today's American culture? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Character Relationships
AP Classroom video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/v6fj3qomur?sui=13,7

3. Reading: Excerpt from Lucy: A Novel by Jamaica Kincaid
Unit 3 Progress Check: FRQ https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/13/assessments/assessments?quizId=590387

4. Discussion

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/11, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/11, Thurs. Work Folder

Topic: Narrative Writing

Unit Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Understand the various strategies that authors use to write stories.
2. Use these various techniques (i.e., snapshots, thought-shots, explode the moment, create a scene) to write a personal narrative.
3. Read their narratives out loud and employ questions to revise their writing.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What are your plans for this midwinter break? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Grammar Lesson

3. Review strategies for writing a narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thought-shot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

4. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

* Please remember to submit your narrative in the Writing Assessment/Personal Narrative pocket.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/10, Wed. Work Folder  in Google Classroom

2/10, Wed. Work Folder

Topic: Narrative Writing

Unit Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Understand the various strategies that authors use to write stories.
2. Use these various techniques (i.e., snapshots, thought-shots, explode the moment, create a scene) to write a personal narrative.
3. Read their narratives out loud and employ questions to revise their writing.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What is one life lesson that has been passed down to you from your parents? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review strategies for writing a narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thought-shot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

3. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

* Please remember to submit your narrative in the Writing Assessment/Personal Narrative pocket.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/9, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/9, Tues. Work Folder

Topic: Narrative Writing

Unit Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Understand the various strategies that authors use to write stories.
2. Use these various techniques (i.e., snapshots, thought-shots, explode the moment, create a scene) to write a personal narrative.
3. Read their narratives out loud and employ questions to revise their writing.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What is your favorite quote from a movie? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review Quiz: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdAj61ZyHrcdBWqS-Q2NOiHt6n6QprJU4o0cCHHO-ZKHWxwbQ/viewform?usp=sf_link

3. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

* Please remember to submit your narrative in the Writing Assessment/Personal Narrative pocket.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/8, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/8, Mon. Work Folder

Topic: Narrative Writing

Unit Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Understand the various strategies that authors use to write stories.
2. Use these various techniques (i.e., snapshots, thought-shots, explode the moment, create a scene) to write a personal narrative.
3. Read their narratives out loud and employ questions to revise their writing.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What is your favorite scene in a movie? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Quiz: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdAj61ZyHrcdBWqS-Q2NOiHt6n6QprJU4o0cCHHO-ZKHWxwbQ/viewform?usp=sf_link

3. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

* Please remember to submit your narrative in the Writing Assessment/Personal Narrative pocket.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/5, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/5, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Use various techniques to write a personal narrative.
2. Read their narratives out loud and employ questions to revise their writing.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: Watch the following video clip.
In a brief narrative, use the "explode the moment" technique to tell what happens prior to the big revelation.

2. Review: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

3. Assignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

4. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/4, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/4, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that they experienced during the fall semester.
2. Revise their writing guided by teacher and peer feedback.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod nearpod.com

1. Energizer

2. Review: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

3. Asignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

4. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Personal Narrative in Google Classroom

Personal Narrative

Narrative Writing Techniques:

1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshots - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions - Anticipate questions that your readers might ask

* Assignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

Due:

2/3, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/3, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that they experienced during the fall semester.
2. Revise their writing guided by teacher and peer feedback.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod nearpod.com

1. Energizer: What is Kanye thinking? Write a "thoughtshot" for him in Zoom chat.

2. Review: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

3. Asignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

4. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/2, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/2, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that they experienced during the fall semester.
2. Revise their writing guided by teacher and peer feedback.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What is your favorite fairytale or children's story? Respond in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

3. Asignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

4. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/22, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/22, Fri. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of plot and structure.
Skill: Explain the function of a significant event or related set of significant events in a plot.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the significance of an event or related set of events in The Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer
Family Guy -- a comical allusion to The Great Gatsby (Thanks Shanice for sharing this link!)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciJXL9bPl2k&feature=youtu.be

2. The Great Gatsby, chapters 1-9.

3. Discussion:
Questions to Consider:
* How is an event in a plot a cause or effect of another event?
* How does an event or related set of events cause, develop, or resolve conflict?
* How can an event or related set of events represent competing value systems?
* How does an event create anticipation or suspense in a reader?
* How does an event or related set of events contribute to meaning in the whole work?

Write a defensible claim about the plot or structure of The Great Gatsby.

Review Video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/hnr7gfalao?sui=13,3

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/21, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/21, Thurs. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of plot and structure.
Skill: Explain the function of a significant event or related set of significant events in a plot.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the significance of an event or related set of events in The Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. The Great Gatsby, chapters 1-9.

3. Discussion:
Questions to Consider:
* How is an event in a plot a cause or effect of another event?
* How does an event or related set of events cause, develop, or resolve conflict?
* How can an event or related set of events represent competing value systems?
* How does an event create anticipation or suspense in a reader?
* How does an event or related set of events contribute to meaning in the whole work?

Write a defensible claim about the plot or structure of The Great Gatsby.

Review Video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/hnr7gfalao?sui=13,3

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/20, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/20, Wed. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of plot and structure.
Skill: Explain the function of a significant event or related set of significant events in a plot.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the significance of an event or related set of events in The Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. The Great Gatsby, chapters 1-8.

3. Discussion:
Questions to Consider:
* How is an event in a plot a cause or effect of another event?
* How does an event or related set of events cause, develop, or resolve conflict?
* How can an event or related set of events represent competing value systems?
* How does an event create anticipation or suspense in a reader?
* How does an event or related set of events contribute to meaning in the whole work?

Write a defensible claim about the plot or structure of The Great Gatsby.

Review Video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/hnr7gfalao?sui=13,3

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* HW: Read The Great Gatsby, chapter 9.

Due:

1/19, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/19, Tues. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of plot and structure.
Skill: Explain the function of a significant event or related set of significant events in a plot.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the significance of an event or related set of events in The Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. The Great Gatsby, chapters 1-7.

3. Discussion:
Questions to Consider:
* How is an event in a plot a cause or effect of another event?
* How does an event or related set of events cause, develop, or resolve conflict?
* How can an event or related set of events represent competing value systems?
* How does an event create anticipation or suspense in a reader?
* How does an event or related set of events contribute to meaning in the whole work?

Write a defensible claim about the plot or structure of The Great Gatsby. Refer to the sample question prompts (attached).

Review Video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/hnr7gfalao?sui=13,3

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* HW: Read The Great Gatsby, chapter 8.

Due:

1/14, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/14, Thurs. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of plot and structure.
Skill: Explain the function of a significant event or related set of significant events in a plot.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain the significance of an event or related set of events in The Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. The Great Gatsby, chapters 1-5.

3. Discussion

Write a defensible claim about the plot or structure of The Great Gatsby. Refer to the sample question prompts (attached).

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* HW: Read The Great Gatsby, chapter 6.

Due:

1/13, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/13, Wed. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of character.
Skill: Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character's perspective, and that character's motives.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the character development of the main characters in the Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. The Great Gatsby, chapters 1-4.

3. Discussion: Characterization--a character's physical, emotional, psychological traits; perspective; motives
What do specific textual details reveal about the character? His or her perspective? Motives?
Analyzing the characters of Nick Carraway (the narrator), Tom Buchanan, Daisy Buchanan, Jordan Baker, George Wilson, Myrtle Wilson, Gatsby, Owl Eyes

Write a defensible claim about one of the characters. Refer to the sample question prompts (attached).

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/12, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/12, Tues. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of character.
Skill: Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character's perspective, and that character's motives.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the character development of the main characters in the Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. The Great Gatsby, chapters 1-3.

3. Discussion: Characterization--a character's physical, emotional, psychological traits; perspective; motives
What do specific textual details reveal about the character? His or her perspective? Motives?
Analyzing the characters of Nick Carraway (the narrator), Tom Buchanan, Daisy Buchanan, Jordan Baker, George Wilson, Myrtle Wilson, Gatsby, Owl Eyes

Write a defensible claim about one of the characters.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/11, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/11, Mon. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of character.
Skill: Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character's perspective, and that character's motives.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the character development of the main characters in the Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. The Great Gatsby, chapters 1-3.

3. Discussion: Characterization--a character's physical, emotional, psychological traits; perspective; motives
What do specific textual details reveal about the character? His or her perspective? Motives?
Analyzing the characters of Nick Carraway (the narrator), Tom Buchanan, Daisy Buchanan, Jordan Baker, George Wilson, Myrtle Wilson, Gatsby, Owl Eyes

Write a defensible claim about one of the characters.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leavin

Due:

1/8, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/8, Fri. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of character.
Skill: Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character's perspective, and that character's motives.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the character development of the main characters in the Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. Review chapter 2.

3. Discussion: Characterization--a character's physical, emotional, psychological traits; perspective; motives

What do specific textual details reveal about the character? His or her perspective? Motives?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/7, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/7, Thurs. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of character.
Skill: Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character's perspective, and that character's motives.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the character development of the narrator Nick Carraway in the Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. Review chapter 1.

3. Discussion: Characterization--a character's physical, emotional, psychological traits; perspective; motives

https://share.nearpod.com/hktxtL1XQcb

Who is Nick Carraway? What do specific textual details reveal about his character? Perspective? Motives?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/6, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/6, Wed. Work Folder

Skill Category: Explain the function of character.
Skill: Identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character's perspective, and that character's motives.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the character development of the narrator Nick Carraway in the Great Gatsby.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: If you could go back into time and visit any era in U.S. history, what time period would you choose? Why? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Introduction to The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

3. Mini Lesson: Characterization--a character's physical, emotional, psychological traits; perspective; motives

4. Discussion: Characterization of Nick Carraway

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

TED Talk Argument Analysis in Google Classroom

TED Talk Argument Analysis

Find and watch a TED talk on TED.com. Choose a talk related to any topics discussed in class or simply watch one that features a speaker on a subject that interests you. As you watch the talk, evaluate its strengths as an argument, in terms of its thesis, claims, evidence, reasoning, and delivery. Write a brief analysis of the talk.

Your analysis should include answers to the following questions:

1. What is the title of the TED talk that you watched?
2. Who is the speaker?
3. What is the speaker’s thesis (message)?
4. Does the speaker back up his or her claims with research or anecdotes? Give examples.
5. How would you describe the delivery (tone, body language, etc.) of the speaker?
6. Overall, how convincing is the speaker’s argument? Explain.

Due:

1/5, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/5, Tues. Work Folder

Progress Check: Unit 2

HW: Read chapter 1 of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Due:

1/4/21, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/4/21, Mon. Work Folder

Happy New Year 2021!

Learning Objective: Students will view a TED talk, then write an analysis of the speaker's argument.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: As we begin the New Year 2021, what is one piece of advice that you would like to share with your peers? Write your New Year's message in the Zoom chat box.

2. Components of Argument in a TED talk
Ted talk: "How books can open your mind"
https://www.ted.com/talks/lisa_bu_how_books_can_open_your_mind?referrer=playlist-talks_to_inspire_new_year_s_re#t-345788

Asynchronous Assignment:
Find and watch a TED talk on TED.com. Choose a talk related to any topics discussed in class or simply watch one that features a speaker on a subject that interests you. As you watch the talk, evaluate its strengths as an argument, in terms of its thesis, claims, evidence, reasoning, and delivery. Write a brief analysis of the talk.

Your analysis should include answers to the following questions:

1. What is the title of the TED talk that you watched?
2. Who is the speaker?
3. What is the speaker’s thesis (message)?
4. Does the speaker back up his or her claims with research or anecdotes? Give examples.
5. How would you describe the delivery (tone, body language, etc.) of the speaker?
6. Overall, how convincing is the speaker’s argument? Explain.

3. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/23, Wed. Work Folder  in Google Classroom

12/23, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain the meaning of various popular allusions.

Skill Category: Explain the function of comparison.
Skill: Identify and explain the function of an allusion.
Essential Knowledge: Allusions in a text can reference literary works including myths and sacred texts; other works of arts including paintings and music; or people, places, events outside the text.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Use an allusion to convey what you are looking forward to in the New Year 2021. Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review the definition and function of an allusion.

3. Identify and explain the meaning of various popular allusions.
Kahoot!

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/22, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/22, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain the meaning of various popular allusions.

Skill Category: Explain the function of comparison.
Skill: Identify and explain the function of an allusion.
Essential Knowledge: Allusions in a text can reference literary works including myths and sacred texts; other works of arts including paintings and music; or people, places, events outside the text.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Use an allusion to to convey any idea. Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review the definition and function of an allusion.

3. Identify and explain the meaning of various popular allusions.
Kahoot!

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/21, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/21, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain the meaning of various popular allusions.

Skill Category: Explain the function of comparison.
Skill: Identify and explain the function of an allusion.
Essential Knowledge: Allusions in a text can reference literary works including myths and sacred texts; other works of arts including paintings and music; or people, places, events outside the text.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Use an allusion to to convey any idea. Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review the definition and function of an allusion.

3. Identify and explain the meaning of various popular allusions.
Kahoot!

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/18, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/18, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to review Unit 5/Poetry II skills and explain the correlated essential knowledge to their peers.

Link to AP Classroom--
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/dl1g8wdoag?sui=13,5
............................................................................................................
Presenters: Miss Uwanique Brown and Miss Malika Burgher

Skill Category: Explain the function of word choice, imagery, and symbols.

Skill: 5.B Explain the function of specific words and phrases in a text.
Essential Knowledge:
1. Descriptive words, such as adjectives and adverbs, qualify or modify the things they describe and affect readers' interaction with the text.
2. Hyperbole exaggerates while understatement minimizes. Exaggerating or minimizing an aspect of an object focuses attention on that trait and conveys a perspective about the object.

Skill: 5.D Identify and explain the function of an image or imagery.
Essential Knowledge:
1. Descriptive words, such as adjectives and adverbs, contribute to sensory imagery.
2. An image can be literal or it can be a form of a comparison that represents something in a text through associations with the senses.
3. A collection of images known as imagery, may emphasize ideas in parts of or throughout a text.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and explain the use of imagery and word choice in a poem.

Agenda:

Do Now: How does racism affect you? Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

1.Watch the assigned review video in AP Classroom that focuses on the function of imagery and word choice (5.B).
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/pzbwkrql1x?sui=13,5

2. Read the poem "Racism" by an anonymous writer. [attached]

3. Discussion:
1.After reading the poem, explain the function of the literary element imagery (the descriptive words or phrases).
2. What is the point of view of the writer?
3. What word choices did the writer use?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/17, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/17, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to review Unit 5/Poetry II skills and explain the correlated essential knowledge to their peers.

Link to AP Classroom--
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/dl1g8wdoag?sui=13,5
............................................................................................................
Presenters: Jassica, Matthew, Raul

Skill Category: Explain the function of comparison.
Skill: Identify and explain the function of an allusion.
Essential Knowledge: Allusions in a text can reference literary works including myths and sacred texts; other works of arts including paintings and music; or people, places, events outside the text.

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze a poem rich with allusions and examine how allusions create meaning in the poem "George Foreman in Zaire" by Jack Bedell.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: Who is your favorite Greek/Roman God or Goddess? Why? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Purpose/Function of an Allusion
Video on allusion is available in AP Classroom: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/j4gms96py4?sui=13,5

3. Reading: "George Foreman in Zaire" by Jack Bedell http://louisianapoetryproject.org/george-foreman-in-zaire/

4. Discussion:
What is an allusion?
What are the different types of allusions?
What is the purpose of an allusion?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/16, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/16, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to review Unit 5/Poetry II skills and explain the correlated essential knowledge to their peers.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Link to AP Classroom--
https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/dl1g8wdoag?sui=13,5

Agenda:

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill (5.A, 5.B, 5.D, 6.B, 6.C, 6.D).
2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.
..................................................................................................................................................................................................
Sample Lesson Plan/Agenda:

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the connotations of words and phrases in the poem "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: Who is someone that you really care about? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Literal vs. Figurative meanings of words and phrases
AP Classroom video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/dl1g8wdoag?sui=13,5

3. Reading: "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman

4. Discussion: What ideas or emotions are associated with...
1. "singing"?
2. "delicious"?
3. "strong melodious songs"?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/15, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/15, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to review Unit 5/Poetry II skills and explain the correlated essential knowledge to their peers.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

In teams--
1. Watch assigned review video from AP Classroom that highlights a required focus skill (5.A, 5.B, 5.D, 6.B, 6.C, 6.D).
2. Prepare a lesson to facilitate a learning objective with the focus skill.
3. Submit a Google Doc with the lesson plan/agenda, resources, links, etc. that will be used to facilitate the lesson.
(I will prepare the daily work folder using your plan of action.)

* The teacher will support learning throughout the entire process.
......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Sample Lesson Plan/Agenda:

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the connotations of words and phrases in the poem "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: Who is someone that you really care about? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Literal vs. Figurative meanings of words and phrases
AP Classroom video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/dl1g8wdoag?sui=13,5

3. Reading: "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman

4. Discussion: What ideas or emotions are associated with...
1. "singing"?
2. "delicious"?
3. "strong melodious songs"?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/14, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/14, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the connotations of words and phrases in the poem "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: Who is someone that you really care about? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Literal vs. Figurative meanings of words and phrases
AP Classroom video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/dl1g8wdoag?sui=13,5

3. Reading: "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman

4. Discussion: What ideas or emotions are associated with...
1. "singing"?
2. "delicious"?
3. "strong melodious songs"?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/11, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/11, Fri. Work Folder

AP Classroom - Unit 1 FRQ (continued)

Individual Student Feedback: Review of Unit 1 Progress Check FRQ 1

Due:

12/10, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/10, Thurs. Work Folder

AP Classroom - Unit 1 FRQ

Individual Student Feedback: Review of Unit 1 Progress Check FRQ 1

Due:

12/9, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/9, Wed. Work Folder

Unit 1 Progress Check

Question 2

Due:

12/8, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/8, Tues. Work Folder

Unit 1 Progress Check

Question 1


Due:

12/7, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/7, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives:
1. Students will be able to develop a claim about the third-person point of view in Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery."
2. Gather evidence to develop an insightful paragraph to defend that claim.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Excerpt from "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson

"Soon the men began to gather, surveying their own children, speaking of planting and rain, tractors and taxes. They stood together, away from the pile of stones in the corner, and their jokes were quiet and they smiled rather than laughed. The women, wearing faded house dresses and sweaters, came shortly after their menfolk. They greeted one another and exchanged bits of gossip as they went to join their husbands. Soon the women, standing by their husbands, began to call to their children, and the children came reluctantly, having to be called four or five times. Bobby Martin ducked under his mother’s grasping hand and ran, laughing, back to the pile of stones. His father spoke up sharply, and Bobby came quickly and took his place between his father and his oldest brother."

1. Do Now: After reading the excerpt from "The Lottery," develop a claim in response to the following question:
How does the point of view help to establish the beginning of the story in Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"?

2. Lesson: Developing a paragraph that includes 1. a claim that requires defense with evidence from the text and 2. the evidence itself

assigned video: https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/qk9s2snaif?sui=13,1

3. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/4, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/4, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives:
1. Students will be able to develop a textually substantiated argument about an interpretation of a chosen excerpt from Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral."
2. Explain the function of a literary element (character/setting/plot and structure/narrator or speaker) or writing strategy that Carver uses to develop ideas supportive of the argument.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Text: "Cathedral" by Raymon Carver
http://www.giuliotortello.it/ebook/cathedral.pdf

Agenda:

1. Do Now: After reading "Cathedral," what reactions or questions do you have about the story?

2. Review: Developing a defensible claim about a literary work
assigned video: apclassroom.collegeboard.org

3. Group work in breakout rooms--
1. Each group will select an excerpt from Carver's short story.
2. Develop an argument (a defensible claim) about an interpretation of the excerpt.
3. Gather textual evidence to support the argument.
4. Explain the function of a literary element or writing strategy that Carver uses to develop ideas supportive of the argument.
5. Prepare a class presentation of these ideas.

4. Group Presentations

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/3, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/3, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives:
1. Students will be able to develop a textually substantiated argument about an interpretation of a chosen excerpt from Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral."
2. Explain the function of a literary element (character/setting/plot and structure/narrator or speaker) or writing strategy that Carver uses to develop ideas supportive of the argument.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Text: "Cathedral" by Raymon Carver
http://www.giuliotortello.it/ebook/cathedral.pdf

Agenda:

1. Do Now: After reading "Cathedral," what reactions or questions do you have about the story?

2. Review: Developing a defensible claim about a literary work
assigned video: apclassroom.collegeboard.org

3. Group work in breakout rooms--
1. Each group will select an excerpt from Carver's short story.
2. Develop an argument (a defensible claim) about an interpretation of the excerpt.
3. Gather textual evidence to support the argument.
4. Explain the function of a literary element or writing strategy that Carver uses to develop ideas supportive of the argument.
5. Prepare a class presentation of these ideas.

4. Group Presentations

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/2, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/2, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives:
1. Students will be able to develop a textually substantiated argument about an interpretation of a chosen excerpt from Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral."
2. Explain the function of a literary element (character/setting/plot and structure/narrator or speaker) or writing strategy that Carver uses to develop ideas supportive of the argument.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Text: "Cathedral" by Raymon Carver
http://www.giuliotortello.it/ebook/cathedral.pdf

Agenda:

1. Do Now: After reading "Cathedral," what reactions or questions do you have about the story?

2. Review: Developing a defensible claim about a literary work
assigned video: apclassroom.collegeboard.org

3. Group work in breakout rooms--
1. Each group will select an excerpt from Carver's short story.
2. Develop an argument (a defensible claim) about an interpretation of the excerpt.
3. Gather textual evidence to support the argument.
4. Explain the function of a literary element or writing strategy that Carver uses to develop ideas supportive of the argument.
5. Prepare a class presentation of these ideas.

4. Group Presentations

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/1, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/1, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives:
1. Students will be able to develop a textually substantiated argument about an interpretation of a chosen excerpt from Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral."
2. Explain the function of a literary element (character/setting/plot and structure/narrator or speaker) or writing strategy that Carver uses to develop ideas supportive of the argument.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Text: "Cathedral" by Raymon Carver
http://www.giuliotortello.it/ebook/cathedral.pdf

Agenda:

1. Do Now: After reading "Cathedral," what reactions or questions do you have about the story?

2. Review: Developing a defensible claim about a literary work
assigned video: apclassroom.collegeboard.org

3. Group work in breakout rooms--
1. Each group will select an excerpt from Carver's short story.
2. Develop an argument (a defensible claim) about an interpretation of the excerpt.
3. Gather textual evidence to support the argument.
4. Explain the function of a literary element or writing strategy that Carver uses to develop ideas supportive of the argument.
5. Prepare a class presentation of these ideas.

4. Group Presentations

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/30, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/30, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to gather evidence from Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral" and use that evidence to develop a claim about the first-person point of view in the story.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: If you were allowed to have only one of the five human senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch), which sense would you want the most? Why?

2. Do Now: Read and annotate the first paragraph of Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral."
http://www.giuliotortello.it/ebook/cathedral.pdf

3. Develop a claim about the first-person point of view in the story.

4. Mini-Lesson: Developing a paragraph that includes a claim requiring defense with textual evidence
[AP Classroom video assigned]

5. Revise (improve) your claim about the first-person point of view in the story "Cathedral."

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Finish reading and annotating the short story "Cathedral."

Due:

11/25, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/25, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to identify examples of literary elements and writing strategies.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What are you grateful for? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review literary elements and writing strategies. Kahoot!
https://kahoot.it/challenge/09294617?challenge-id=58dde52f-dd07-4c67-be88-e7776de1e2ef_1606252733636

3. Text-based response: analysis of a central idea AND a literary element/writing strategy

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Due:

11/24, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/24, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop substantiated arguments about interpretations of part or all of a text ("The Story of an Hour") -- continued.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/SuLzTwxYCbb

1. Do Now/Energizer: What does it mean to be "free" in a relationship?
Draw your representation or symbol of freedom.

2. Mini-Lesson: Developing a Claim

3. Collaborative Discussion Boards: As you are reading, what ideas come to mind?

4. Writing a claim (a defensible thesis statement)

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/23, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/23, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop substantiated arguments about interpretations of part or all of a text ("The Story of an Hour").

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/SuLzTwxYCbb

1. Do Now/Energizer: What does it mean to be "free" in a relationship?
Draw your representation or symbol of freedom.

2. Mini-Lesson: Developing a Claim

3. Collaborative Discussion Boards: As you are reading, what ideas come to mind?

4. Writing a claim (a defensible thesis statement)

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Unit 1 Progress Check in Google Classroom

Unit 1 Progress Check

Due:

11/20, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/20, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will complete Unit 1 Progress Check: MCQ.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: What are you looking forward to doing this weekend? (Write in the Zoom chat box.)

2. Unit 1 Progress Check: MCQ

3. Before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/19, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/19, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify the plot structure of Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour" and discuss the function of that structure.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer Question: What are you most proud of? (Write in the Zoom chat box.)

2. Do Now: Unit 1 Progress Check: MCQ 1 https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/
(Try to pace yourself to complete this question within five minutes.)

3. Mini-Lesson: Review: The Function of Structure

4. Discussion:
1. How does a particular sequence of events affect the presentation and/or development of characters and conflict?
2. How does a particular sequence of events and the manner in which a text presents those events to a reader affect a reader's experience with the text?

5. Writing Assignment: How does the structure of Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour" affect the presentation and/or development of characters and conflict?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/18, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/18, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. Understand the various types of structures that can be used to tell a story.
2. Explain how the structure of "The Story of an Hour" impacts the development of the story's plot.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Nearpod https://share.nearpod.com/FI7LH4d0ubb

1. Review Structure: Match the term with its definition.

2. Discussion in breakout rooms:
Complete the two Nearpod activities assigned to your group.
1. If you were to use one of the other structure types to rewrite "The Story of an Hour," how would you begin the story?
2. What impact or purpose would organizing the story in this way have on developing the key ideas of the story?

3. Share-out

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/17, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/17, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain how the structure of "The Story of an Hour" develops key ideas in the story.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: In you were to write your autobiography, what would you write as the first sentence of your life story? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: the function of a story's structure (linear, nonlinear, in media res, flashback, framed narrative, epistolary)

3. Discussion in breakout rooms (each room will be given one of the structure types to discuss):
If you were to use one of the other structure types to rewrite "The Story of an Hour," how would you begin the story?
What purpose would organizing the story in this way have on developing the key ideas of the story?

4. Share-out

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/16, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/16, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand key ideas in "The Story of an Hour" and summarize the plot of the story.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: What reactions or questions do you have about "The Story of an Hour"?

2. Review key ideas and plot. Kahoot! (self-paced learning) https://kahoot.it/challenge/09617866?challenge-id=58dde52f-dd07-4c67-be88-e7776de1e2ef_1605474828746

3. Writing Assignment: Write a one-paragraph summary of "The Story of an Hour."
Go to Google classroom: Classwork/Writing Assessments/Plot Summary of "The Story of an Hour"

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/13, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/13, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the impact that the setting has on other elements of a story in "The Story of an Hour."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Yesterday's assignment was to write a paragraph analyzing the impact that the story's setting has on another element (characters, conflict, mood, theme, etc.).

Do Now: What challenges or questions do you have about yesterday's writing assignment? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review strategies for writing a text-based response on "the function of setting."

3. Peer-critique/Revisions (Breakout rooms will be scheduled according to student needs)

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Plot Summary of

Plot Summary of "The Story of an Hour"

Write a one-paragraph summary of the short story "The Story of an Hour." Be sure to use your own words.

Due:

11/12, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/12, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the impact that the setting has on other elements of a story in "The Story of an Hour."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: What make-believe world would you want to live in?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1OEDmYicdzpnAGrZFAcSOxjjbNFia7duSqm_nHS8YeAw/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: the function of a story's setting
Consider a story that takes place in a school. What would be the function or impact of the setting on the development of characters, conflict, mood, and themes?

3. Reading: "The Story of an Hour"
https://www.owleyes.org/text/the-story-of-an-hour/read/chopins-short-story#root-36

4. Discussion:
1. Review--What is the setting of "The Story of an Hour"?
2. How does the the setting impact other elements of the story?

5. Writing Assignment: Write a paragraph analyzing the impact that the story's setting has on another element (characters, conflict, mood, theme, etc.). Go to Google classroom: Classwork/Writing Assessments/Function of Setting - "The Story of an Hour"

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Function of Setting -

Function of Setting - "The Story of an Hour"

Writing Assignment: Write a paragraph analyzing the impact that the story's setting has on another element (characters, conflict, mood, theme, etc.).

Due:

11/10, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/10, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and describe specific textual details that convey or reveal a setting in "The Story of an Hour."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: How would you describe the setting of your neighborhood? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Setting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30CPmgVQNks

3. Reading: "The Story of an Hour" (paragraphs 1-5)
https://www.owleyes.org/text/the-story-of-an-hour/read/chopins-short-story#root-36

4. Discussion:
1. How does setting contribute to the plot of a story?
2. What is the setting of "The Story of an Hour"?
Use the attached graphic organizer to identify and describe specific textual details that convey or reveal a setting in paragraphs 1-5 of "The Story of an Hour."

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/9, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/9, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to read and annotate Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: If you could have an extra hour today to do anything that you wanted, what would you do with the time? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. About the Author: Kate Chopin https://www.katechopin.org/

3. Reading: "The Story of an Hour"
text: https://www.owleyes.org/text/the-story-of-an-hour/read/chopins-short-story#root-36
audio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9S4btsmp70

4. As you read, annotate the text. Include commentary about key ideas, writing strategies, vocabulary words, questions, reactions, etc.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/6, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/6, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to use rubrics to evaluate and revise their text-based response on "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Energizer: Choose a camera video filter that suits your mood today!

2. Do Now: Review rubrics for writing a text-based response. In your own words, summarize what must a text-based response must have in order for it to receive the highest score. Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

3. Work Period:
Breakout Room 1: Asynchronous writing
Breakout Room 2: Peer-critiquing
Breakout Room 3: Peer-critiquing
Breakout Room 4: Peer-critiquing
Breakout Room 5: Teacher Feedback

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/5, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/5, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to use rubrics to evaluate and revise their text-based response on "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Energizer: Choose a camera video filter that suits your mood today!

2. Do Now: What challenges did you have writing your text-based response on "My Last Duchess"?
Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

3. Rereading of "My Last Duchess" (have students read out loud)

4. Open Discussion:
What questions are left unanswered about the Duke? The Duchess? What other questions do you still have about what takes place in this dramatic monologue?

5. Mini-Lesson: writing a text-based central idea response/using rubrics to help you evaluate and revise written work

6. Asynchronous Writing

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/4, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/4, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning uses symbolism to ultimately develop the Duke's character in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/vsph/1L5iygUXMu
Do Now/Energizer: What is an object of great importance to you? Why?

2. Mini-Lesson: Symbolism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkI6cn8wwgM

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 47-56)
Vocabulary: munificence, dowry

4. Discussion:
1. What questions are left unanswered about the Duke? The Duchess? What other questions do you still have about what takes place in this dramatic monologue? (collaborative discussion board)
2. How convinced are you that the Duke had the Duchess executed (or at least, locked up in a dungeon)? (poll)
3. How does the double-meaning of the word "object" (line 53) confirm the suspicious nature of the Duke? (collaborative discussion board)
4. What is the impact of the word choice "taming" (line 55)? (collaborative discussion board)
5. How is the bronze statue of Neptune symbolic? (collaborative discussion board)

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Text-based Response on

Text-based Response on "My Last Duchess"

Due:

11/3, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/3, Tues. Work Folder

Election Day - Remote Instruction (Asynchronous)

Catch up with work and practice self-care!

Please click on the "MARK AS DONE" button in this folder to receive attendance and class participation credit for today.

Due:

11/2, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/2, Mon. Work Folder

Do Now: What were your reactions to the Duke's "commands"? Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

Audio Recording: "My Last Duchess" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZxq3r7TlHo

Asynchronous Writing Assignment: Text-based Response on "My Last Duchess"
Go to:
Google classroom/Writing Assessments/Text-based Response on "My Last Duchess"


Due:

10/30, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/30, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how verbal irony contributes to the development of the Duke's character in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/iD82GlGJYab
Do Now: Based on your understanding of irony, give an example of irony from any literary work, movie, or television show.

2. Mini-Lesson: Verbal Irony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiR-bnCHIYo
double entendre -- a word or phrase open to two interpretations, one of which is usually risqué or indecent.

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 34-47)

4. Breakout Rooms/Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. What is ironic about lines 34-35, "Who'd stoop to blame this sort of trifling?"
2. How is the word "lessoned" (line 40) a double entendre?
3. Reread lines 45-46: "I gave commands; then all smiles stopped together." To whom did the Duke "give commands"? What do you think his command was?
4. How is the phrase "as if alive" (line 47) a double entendre?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/29, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/29, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning uses irony to develop the complex character of the Duke in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/Rkt479uhXab

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: Describe a time when someone or something surprised you. What made this event so surprising to you?

2. Mini-Lesson: Irony (verbal/dramatic/situational)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEDxPwwMkBk
How is irony used in each of these cinematic scenes?

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 34-43)

4. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. What does the word "stoop" (line 34) suggest about how the Duke views the Duchess?
2. What does the Duke say about his own speaking ability (lines 35-36)?
3. What other things does the Duke say that might make the reader suspicious of his character?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/28, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/28, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how the Duke's point of view develops the characterization of the Duchess in "My Last Duchess." (continued)

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/yv4dMZTJVab
Do Now: Draw a picture or upload an image of one of the following:
1. a child hugging a stuffed animal
2. a gorgeous sunset
3. a branch of cherries
4. a person riding a horse

2. Review: Point of View (first person/omniscient/objective/limited)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0OSmvCXiTg
From what point of view is the story being told? What is the Duke's point of view about the Duchess?

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 21-34)

4. Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/ledDZYwoVab
Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. Reread lines 21-22: "She had a heart --how shall I say?--too soon made glad/Too easily impressed..." What is the effect of the repetition in these lines?
2. What does the Duke mean when he claims the Duchess' "looks went everywhere" (line 24)?
3. Reread lines 25-29. What is something that would make the Duchess happy or "blush" (line 31)? Draw or upload an image of it.

4. From the Duke's perspective, how does the Duchess value his "gift of a nine-hundred years old name" (line 32)?
5. What inferences can you make about the Duchess based on lines 1-34?

5. Writing Response: How does the Duke describe the Duchess? Would you consider the Duke's point of view of the Duchess to be objective or limited? Why?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/27, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/27, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how the Duke's point of view develops the characterization of the Duchess in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda (to be completed over 2 classes):

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/ledDZYwoVab

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: What is something that makes you happy?

2. Review asynchronous Nearpod assignment (10/26).

3. Mini-Lesson: Point of View (first person/omniscient/objective/limited)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0OSmvCXiTg
From what point of view is the story being told? What is the Duke's point of view about the Duchess?

4. Vocabulary https://docs.google.com/document/d/1S2k0AXwT3sGAMAmXljaGp9TORHbQpNM8NGm2VHHiQiE/edit

5. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 21-34)

6. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. Reread lines 21-22: "She had a heart --how shall I say?--too soon made glad/Too easily impressed..." What is the effect of the repetition in these lines?
2. What does the Duke mean when he claims the Duchess' "looks went everywhere" (line 24)?
3. Reread lines 25-29. What is something that would make the Duchess happy or "blush" (line 31)? Draw or upload an image of it.
4. From the Duke's perspective, how does the Duchess value his "gift of a nine-hundred years old name" (line 32)?
5. What inferences can you make about the Duchess based on lines 1-34?

7. Writing Response: How does the Duke describe the Duchess? Would you consider the Duke's point of view of the Duchess to be objective or limited? Why?

8. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/26, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/26, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning develops the characters of the Duke and Duchess in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda (abbreviated class):

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Nearpod (self-paced): https://share.nearpod.com/nixZHnsiSab

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: Mark Twain once said, "I can live for two months on a good compliment."
Think about the meaning of his quote. What is the best compliment that anyone has ever given you?

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization--What does the Duke say about the Duchess? How do we learn more about the Duke based on what he says about the Duchess?

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 13-24)

4. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. In your own words, rewrite Fra Pandolf's compliment to the Duchess: (lines 16-19).
2. What word(s) does the Duke use to describe the compliments that the Duchess might have received from Fra Pandolf? What might the Duke's choice of words tell you about himself?

Asynchronous--
3. Reread lines 21-22: "She had a heart --how shall I say?--too soon made glad/Too easily impressed..." What is the effect of the repetition in these lines?
4. What does the Duke mean when he claims the Duchess' "looks went everywhere"?
5. What else do you learn about the Duke and Duchess in lines 13-24?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/23, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/23, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning develops the character of the Duchess in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://share.nearpod.com/rg5dcUurNab
* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: Describe what you look for in a significant other.

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization (direct/indirect)

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 21-34)

4. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. Reread lines 21-22: "She had a heart --how shall I say?--too soon made glad/Too easily impressed..." What is the effect of the repetition in these lines?
2. What does the Duke mean when he claims the Duchess's "looks went everywhere"?
3. What inferences can you make about the Duchess based on lines 25-29?
4. From the Duke's perspective, how does the Duchess value his "gift of a nine-hundred years old name" (line 32)?

5. Writing Response: What do you learn about the characters of the Duke and the Duchess in lines 29-34? What is left uncertain about the Duke and Duchess in these lines?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/22, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/22, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning develops the character of the Duke in "My Last Duchess."
(continuation)

Agenda:

Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Review lines 1-2: "That's my last Duchess painted on the wall/Looking as if she were alive."
What might the phrase "looking as if she were alive" tell you about the Duchess or the painting of the Duchess?
Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization (direct/indirect)
What does the Duke say? What are the actions of the Duke?

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 1-21)

4. Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/WzD2aOh1Jab
Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. For what reasons might the Duke mention Fra Pandolf twice in the first six lines of the poem?
2. Where does the Duke keep the painting of the Duchess?

5. Writing Response: What do you learn about the portrait? How does this develop your understanding of the Duke's character?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/21, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/21, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning develops the character of the Duke in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://share.nearpod.com/WzD2aOh1Jab
* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Review-- "That's my last Duchess painted on the wall..."
1. What is the literal definition and part of speech of the word "my"? What might the speaker's use of the word "my" suggest about his tone?
2. What is the literal definition and part of speech of the word "last"? What might the use of the word "last" mean about the Duchess?

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization (direct/indirect)

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 1-21)

4. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. What tone does the Duke display when he says, "Will 't please you sit and look at her?"
2. For what reasons might the Duke mention Fra Pandolf twice in the first six lines of the poem?
3. Where does the Duke keep the painting of the Duchess?

5. Writing Response: What do you learn about the portrait? How does this develop your understanding of the Duke's character?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/20, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/20, Tues. Work Folder

Skill 5.B: Students will be able to explain the function of word choice and its impact on characterization in lines 1-8 of "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://share.nearpod.com/MyWd6zLSIab
* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: What do you see in the painting?

2. About the Author: Robert Browning

3. Mini-Lesson: Word Choice

4. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 1-8)
Annotate the pronouns.

5. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. What specific words and phrases does the speaker use to describe the Duchess? What do these words suggest about the Duchess?
2. What does the reader learn about the Duchess from the description of her portrait in the first eight lines of the poem?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/19, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/19, Mon. Work Folder

Skill 1.A: Students will be able to identify and describe what specific textual details reveal about a character, that character's perspective, and that character's motives.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Who is your favorite superhero? Why? Write your answer in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization https://apclassroom.collegeboard.org/d/nhcovluc7p?sui=13,1

3. Read and annotate lines 1-8 of "My Last Duchess." https://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poems/my-last-duchess
In your notebook, write everything that you learn about the speaker of the poem.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit for today.

Due:

Text-Analysis Response on

Text-Analysis Response on "We Wear the Mask"

Your Task:

Closely read the poem “We Wear the Mask” and write a well-developed, text-based response of two to three paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the text and analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text.

Due:

10/16, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/16, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to write a text-analysis response on "We Wear the Mask."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Using the attached rubric, what score would you give this writing sample (attached below) for each criterion? What overall score would you give the response?

2. Writing Instruction: Developing Ideas

3. Work Period:
Write a text-analysis response on "We Wear the Mask."
*SUBMIT FOR GRADING* [Google Classroom/Classwork/Writing Assessments/Text-Analysis Response on "We Wear the Mask"]

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before exiting TODAY, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit for today.

Due:

10/15, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/15, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives:
Students will be able to understand how Dunbar uses metaphor to develop a central idea in "We Wear the Mask."

Agenda:

* Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Simply, tell me how your day is going so far? Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Metaphor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPEmbt8Qoy0

3. Discussion in breakout rooms:
1. What writing strategies does Dunbar use in "We Wear the Mask"?
2. What does __________ mean in the poem? (interpreting examples of metaphors/figurative language/diction)

4. Share out

5. Writing instruction: Use metaphor in your own writing to convey how your day is going so far. *Exit Ticket

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before exiting TODAY, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit for today .

Due:

10/14, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/14, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. compose a central idea (thesis statement) about the identity of the speaker in "We Wear the Mask."
2. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://Nearpod.com Join Code: PSMLU
* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: What is something that most people don't know about you that you are willing to share?

2. Mini-Lesson: Composing a Central Idea about the Speaker of a text

3. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. Why can’t the speaker be honest with most people in America?
2. Explain the expression, “Eyes are the windows to the soul.” What can eyes reveal?
3. Give an example of masked emotions and explain why that person feels the need.
4. Could this poem have been written today and still describe present day people and situations? Why or why not?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/13, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/13, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to read and annotate a poem "We Wear the Mask" by Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Agenda:

1. Do Now: Describe the mask or costume you would wear to a masquerade (a party, dance, or other festive gathering of persons wearing masks and other disguises)? Write your answer in the Zoom chat box.
Support: Images of masquerade masks and costumes
https://www.google.com/search?q=masquerade+pictures&oq=masquerade+pictures&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l7.3987j0j15&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

2. Mini-Lesson: How to annotate a poem. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5TnKNP_LP4
Paul Laurence Dunbar: Author's Bio.

3. Read and annotate "We Wear the Mask." https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44203/we-wear-the-mask
Support: poem recitation by Maya Angelou. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HLol9InMlc

4. Discussion:
1. What are the speaker’s emotions?
2. What does it mean to wear a mask?
3. Why would a person wear a “mask?”

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

Text-based Response (Final Copy) -

Text-based Response (Final Copy) - "Everyday Use"

Due:

10/9, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/9, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to write and revise a text-based response, which includes a central idea, supporting evidence, and analysis, on "Everyday Use."

Agenda:

Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Using the attached rubric, what score would you give this writing sample (attached below) for each criterion? What overall score would you give the response?

2. Writing Instruction: Evidence/Analysis

3. Work Period:
Select one text-based response that you wrote on "Everyday Use." Proofread, revise, and edit it, using writing strategies discussed in class. *SUBMIT YOUR FINAL COPY FOR GRADING* [Google Classroom/Classwork/Writing Assessments/Text-based Response on "Everyday Use" -- Final Copy]

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/8, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/8, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to analyze how Walker uses symbolism to develop a central idea in "Everyday Use."

Agenda:

Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now:
1. Complete the Student Contact Sheet (please include your own cell phone #). https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfOQEC5mLA1ftkrIvLeRn7HPPMs3FbPtNjpKrmpI0uIvKF6Gg/viewform?usp=sf_link
2. What is something (an object) that is of great importance to you? Why?
Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson on Symbolism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkI6cn8wwgM

3. Whole-Class/Small-Group Discussion
* Think about the most important object in the story, the quilts. Think about the history of quilts, and discuss how the quilts may be symbols of something deeper.

* What other examples of symbolism are used in the story? How are these symbols representative of something deeper?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/7, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/7, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...

1. listen to and understand an interpretation of "Everyday Use."
2. compose a central idea (thesis statement) about heritage or "cultural artifact."
3. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

Agenda:

Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now:
heritage -- something that is handed down from the past, as a tradition: a national heritage of honor, pride, and courage. something that comes or belongs to one by reason of birth
What is something from your heritage that is of importance to you? Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

2. Audio-Photo interpretation of "Everyday Use" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bt16zLid2-w
As you view the video, pay particular attention to details and commentary about HERITAGE and CULTURAL ARTIFACT.
Also, continue to add to your annotations.

3. Whole-Class/Small-Group Discussion
* What does Dee say or do that reflects a growing interest in preserving her heritage? How is the butter churn used to contrast Dee's relationship with her heritage with Maggie's? Is there anything ironic about Dee's connection to her heritage?
* Think about the most important object in the story, the quilts. Think about the history of quilts, and discuss how the quilts may be symbols of something deeper.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.


Due:

10/6, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/6, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...

1. compose a central idea (thesis statement) about a mother-daughter relationship in "Everyday Use."
2. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

Agenda:

Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Describe your relationship with your mother or guardian. Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Composing a Central Idea about the RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN A MOTHER AND DAUGHTER

Question: What are some factors that affect your relationship with your mother?

3. Review Class Participation Grade

4. Whole-Class & Small-Group Discussion
* What do you imagine the mother’s relationship with Dee was like when Dee was at home? Were they
close? How do you think the mother feels about Dee’s success? Is she proud or does she have
mixed feelings? What is the significance of the daydream where Mother and Dee are together on the
TV show?
* Think about the relationship between Maggie and her mother. How do you imagine they get along?
What clues are available to you from the text?

5. Text-based Response [Google Classroom/Writing Assessments/Central Idea: Mother-Daughter Relationship in "Everyday Use"] *SUBMIT FOR GRADE*
1. Compose a central idea about Mother's relationship with one of her daughters, Dee or Maggie.
2. Provide specific and relevant textual evidence.
3. Make clear connections.

6. Exit Ticket

Due:

Central Idea: Mother-Daughter Relationship in

Central Idea: Mother-Daughter Relationship in "Everyday Use"

Write a text-based response of at least one paragraph, analyzing the central idea of a mother-daughter relationship in "Everyday Use."
Remember to --
1. Compose a central idea about Mother's relationship with one of her daughters, Dee or Maggie.
2. Provide specific and relevant textual evidence.
3. Make clear connections.

Due:

10/5, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/5, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. compose a central idea (thesis statement) about the identity of one or more of the characters in "Everyday Use."
2. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://Nearpod.com Join Code: U85SH
* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: What makes us who we are? What factors contribute to shaping a person's identity?

2. Mini-Lesson: Composing a Central Idea about IDENTITY

3. Class Participation Grade

4. Whole-Class & Small-Group Discussion:
1. Select a character: Mother/Maggie/Dee
2. Compose a central idea about that character's identity.
3. Provide specific and relevant textual evidence.
4. Make clear connections.

5. Exit Ticket

Due:

HW:

HW: "Everyday Use" Annotations

Due:

10/2, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/2, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: (continued) Students will be able to understand how Walker uses characterization to develop the character of the mother, Maggie, and Dee in "Everyday Use."

Agenda:

1. Do Now: 10-minute Quiz on Characterization (see Google Doc attachment below). * SUBMIT for GRADE.

2. Breakout Rooms - Discussion and Character Analysis: mother/Maggie/Dee
Complete Nearpod slides for your assigned character. Nearpod -- https://app.nearpod.com/presentation?pin=PGAOH
1. What do you know about your character? Post elements of her character using the S.T.E.A.L. method.
2. Create a collage depicting your character's physical and personality traits.

3. Group Presentations

4. Exit Ticket

HW: Finish reading and annotating the short story "Everyday Use." (You do not need to submit your annotations this time.)

Have a good weekend!

Due:

Quiz: Characterization in Google Classroom

Quiz: Characterization

Due:

10/1, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/1, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Walker uses characterization to develop the character of the mother, Maggie, and Dee in "Everyday Use."

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://app.nearpod.com/presentation?pin=PGAOH
* Do all work in Nearpod.

1. Do Now: Share one of your annotations from p. 1 of "Everyday Use." Include the paragraph number of your annotation. For example: In paragraph 2, I circled an unfamiliar word "homely." I looked up the the definition of the word, which means plain or ordinary looking.

2. Mini-lesson: Characterization
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCshdu8loDo

3. Breakout Rooms - Discussion and Character Sketch: mother/Maggie/Dee

4. Group Presentations

5. Exit Ticket

* HW: Read and annotate p. 2 of "Everyday Use." SUBMIT for GRADE.

Due:

9/30, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

9/30, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to read and annotate a short story, "Everyday Use" by Alice Walker.

Agenda:

1. Do Now: When you read complex text, what are some annotation strategies that you use? (Example: Paraphrase ideas). Write your answer in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review: Central Idea of yesterday's video clip

3. Mini-lesson & Guided Practice: How to annotate a text
https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+annotate+text+while+reading&oq=how+to+annotate+text&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l7.7669j0j15&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#kpvalbx=_QTBzX4j7IaOt_QbL1aygAw18

4. Alice Walker: Author's Bio. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Alice-Walker

5. Read and annotate "Everyday Use" (p. 1).
https://intensiveenglish1.weebly.com/uploads/1/3/0/4/13041485/everyday_use_full-text.pdf

6. Exit Ticket
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeXQZSJcjpdMPq-6tyEXDf5GKf5gTPKE_lSBJuTCO2PW-RePQ/viewform

Due:

9/29, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

9/29, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to determine a central idea in a literary work and support their analysis with specific and relevant details.

Agenda:
Nearpod -- self-paced: https://nearpod.com
Nearpod Code: NETRI
* Do all work in Nearpod.

1. Do Now: If your life were a movie, which one would it be? Explain your choice.

2. Mini-lesson: Central Idea

3. Video clip: "Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius - Getting Ready for School"
Literary Analysis: 1. Determine a central idea of the video clip. 2. Provide supporting evidence.

4. Exit Ticket
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeXQZSJcjpdMPq-6tyEXDf5GKf5gTPKE_lSBJuTCO2PW-RePQ/viewform

Due:

9/25 -- Do Now Assignment:

9/25 -- Do Now Assignment: "I, Too" by Langston Hughes

Fri., 9/25/20
15. minutes
Do Now:
Read the poem "I, Too" by Langston Hughes, then in one to two paragraphs, answer the following questions, providing supporting details and analysis:
1. What does the poem reveal about the speaker's identity?
2. How does Hughes use at least one literary technique to develop the speaker's identity?

Due:

9/25, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

9/25, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to cite strong and thorough evidence to support analysis of a speaker's "identity" ("I, Too" by Langston Hughes and various "I Am" poems written by students)

Agenda:

1. *Do Now (15 min.) - will be GRADED
Read the poem "I, Too" by Langston Hughes, then in one to two paragraphs, answer the following questions, providing supporting details and analysis (*rubric attached): https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/47558/i-too
Support: You may wish to watch a read-aloud of the poem. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CmKf9nZ_4I
1. What does the poem reveal about the speaker's identity?
2. How does Hughes use at least one literary technique to develop the speaker's identity?

2. Review & Mini-lesson

3. Breakout Rooms - students share out "I Am" poems; *note-taking

4. *Exit Ticket (access in Google classroom: Daily -- Exit Ticket)
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeXQZSJcjpdMPq-6tyEXDf5GKf5gTPKE_lSBJuTCO2PW-RePQ/viewform

Due:

9/25 -- Note Sheet for

9/25 -- Note Sheet for "I Am" poem

Use this note-taking template to record important ideas about the selected "I Am" poem.

Due:

9/23-9/25 --

9/23-9/25 -- "I Am..." poem

Write an "I Am..." using the examples and guidelines attached. The purpose of this exercise is to share a little more about your deeper identity--who you are, what you think about, what you hope for, etc. Please be ready to share.