English 6-period 3 Assignments

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Past Assignments

Due:

6/1-6/4 Scholars' Week in Google Classroom

6/1-6/4 Scholars' Week

* Please note: For this week, you will follow an individualized action plan based on your academic progress.


Check-in: What is one word that describes how you are feeling?  Respond in the Zoom chat box.


Asynchronous Work (ALL students) 
* Due Fri, June 4th *


Writing Assessment:


Text-Analysis Response based on your student-led lesson


Your Task: 


Write a well-developed,
text-based response of two to three paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the
text and analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary
technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence
from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text. 


Guidelines:
Be sure to:

Identify a central idea in the text 
Analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary
technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Examples include:
characterization, conflict, denotation/connotation, metaphor, simile, irony,
language use, point-of-view, setting, structure, symbolism, theme, tone, etc. 
Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis 
Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner 
Maintain a formal style of writing 
Follow the conventions of standard written English



Individualized Action Plan (more details will be given in class):

Attend specified virtual class meetings to receive NX coaching and complete previous course assignments.
Attend specified virtual class meetings to make up current coursework, which includes completing missing or incomplete assignments in Google classroom. 
Break-out Rooms
Work on asynchronous assignments

Due:

Text Analysis Response on Student-Led Lesson in Google Classroom

Text Analysis Response on Student-Led Lesson

Due:

5/28, Fri. Work Folder: Student Lesson Template in Google Classroom

5/28, Fri. Work Folder: Student Lesson Template

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to compose and facilitate a lesson to...
1. determine a central idea in a literary work.
2. analyze the impact of the author's choices and writing strategies to convey key ideas.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.


Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate __________!

Agenda:

1. Energizer

2. Mini-Lesson

3. Activities

4. Assessment

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/27, Thurs. Work Folder: Student-Led Lesson Template in Google Classroom

5/27, Thurs. Work Folder: Student-Led Lesson Template

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to compose and facilitate a lesson to...
1. determine a central idea in a literary work.
2. analyze the impact of the author's choices and writing strategies to convey key ideas.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.


Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate __________!

Agenda:

1. Energizer

2. Mini-Lesson

3. Activities

4. Assessment

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/26, Wed. Work Folder: Student-Led Lesson Template in Google Classroom

5/26, Wed. Work Folder: Student-Led Lesson Template

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to compose and facilitate a lesson to...
1. determine a central idea in a literary work.
2. analyze the impact of the author's choices and writing strategies to convey key ideas.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.


Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate __________!

Agenda:

1. Energizer

2. Mini-Lesson

3. Activities

4. Assessment

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/26, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/26, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students are able to go back in time to their childhood and recreate a little part from “Diary Of A Wimpy Kid: Hard Luck” then figure out what writing strategy they used. 

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.


Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate...

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Have you ever had a friendship change because someone got into a relationship?

2. Mini-Lesson: Writing Strategy Review

3. Activities
-Reading pages 1-5 (see attachment)
-Which writing strategies can you identify in this excerpt? -poll
-Practice using writing strategies -collaborate boards

4. Assessment: Use a writing strategy covered in this lesson to convey a central idea....

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

May 21-25 Work Folder in Google Classroom

May 21-25 Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to compose and facilitate a lesson to...
1. determine a central idea of Living Up the Street, "The Savings Book," or a choice of another literary work in the eleventh grade text complexity band.
2. analyze the impact of the author's choices and writing strategies to convey key ideas.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer

2. Literary Discussion Questions (in breakout rooms)
1. Did you find the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his or her story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4. How did the literary work make you reflect on your own life?
5. What annotations can you share with your classmates?

3. Mini-Lesson: Developing a Lesson
- Learning Objectives
- Energizer
- Mini-Lesson (includes skills and knowledge that students should acquire)
- Activities (includes reading, writing, and discussion)
- Assessment
- Resources/Materials (e.g. Nearpod, Jamboard, Google Slides)


4. Planning and Collaboration:
Write your lesson plan in a Google Doc.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Student Lesson  in Google Classroom

Student Lesson

Due:

5/20, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/20, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to compose and facilitate a lesson to...
1. determine a central idea of Living Up the Street, "The Savings Book."
2. analyze the author Gary Soto's use of writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his narrative.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: If you won a $1 million dollar lottery, what would you do with the money?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Memoir Discussion Questions (in breakout rooms)
1. Did you find the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his or her story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4. How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?
5. What annotations can you share with your classmates?

3. Mini-Lesson: Developing a Lesson
- Learning Objectives
- Energizer
- Mini-Lesson (includes skills and knowledge that students should acquire)
- Activities (includes reading, writing, and discussion)
- Assessment
- Resources/Materials (e.g. Nearpod, Jamboard, Google Slides)


4. Planning and Collaboration:
Write your lesson plan in a Google Doc.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/19, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/19, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand and explain how Soto uses literary elements and writing techniques to develop key ideas in his narrative "The Savings Book."

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Nearpod 

1. Energizer: What was the first job or hustle that you had that made you money, or how did you earn your first dollar?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review "The Savings Book." 

3. Academic Discourse: 
- How does Soto use sarcasm and verbal irony in the first paragraph?
- How does Soto use juxtaposition in the second paragraph?
- How did Gary earn money to put away in his savings?
- What were some things that Gary bought that had him withdraw money from his savings?
- What central idea or message does Soto's narrative "The Savings Book" impart?
- What thoughts, reactions, questions, etc. did you have about any part of the reading?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/18, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/18, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand and explain how Soto uses literary elements and writing techniques to develop key ideas in his narrative "The Savings Book."

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Nearpod 

1. Energizer: Recall a time when you had to save up for something that you really wanted. What did you want to buy but couldn't afford?

2. Review "The Savings Book." 

3. Academic Discourse: 
- How does Soto use sarcasm and verbal irony in the first paragraph?
- How does Soto use juxtaposition in the second paragraph?
- How did Gary earn money to put away in his savings?
- What were some things that Gary bought that had him withdraw money from his savings?
- What central idea or message does Soto's narrative "The Savings Book" impart?
- What thoughts, reactions, questions, etc. did you have about any part of the reading?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/17, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/17, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine the central ideas of Living Up the Street, "The Savings Book" by Gary Soto. 
2. identify the writing strategies that Soto uses to develop key ideas in his narrative.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer


2. Asynchronous Learning: Read and annotate "The Savings Book" by Gary Soto. 


Attached Resources: copy of "The Savings Book" (Google doc)/copy of "The Savings Book" (online copy with commentary)/list of universal central ideas and themes in literature/writing strategies refresher/annotation worksheet

3. Discussion Questions--Be sure to explain your answers referring to textual details.
1. Did you find this part of the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4. How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/12, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/12, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand and explain how Soto uses literary elements and writing techniques to develop key ideas in his narrative "Summer School."

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Nearpod 

1. Energizer: What is a holiday or family tradition that you celebrate?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Plot Details----> Central Ideas 

3. Academic Discourse: 
- What do you think of when you hear the words "summer school"?
- What are some specific things that Gary did in summer school?
- How do you think going to summer school shaped Gary's adolescent development?
- What thoughts, reactions, questions, etc. did you have about any part of the reading?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/14, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/14, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops a central idea in his narrative "Summer School."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop key ideas in the story.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate Jonathan John!

Agenda:

Nearpod

1. Energizer

2. Mini-Lesson: The Central Idea of Talent
* You should believe in your talent and potential.  Never lose hope.

3. Supporting a Central Idea with Textual Evidence

4. Short Response -- Support the central idea statement, providing specific and relevant evidence from the text. Be sure to explain your ideas fully.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/11, Tues.Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/11, Tues.Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand and explain how Soto uses literary elements and writing techniques to develop key ideas in his narrative "Summer School."

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Nearpod 

1. Energizer: What is a holiday or family tradition that you celebrate?  Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Reread "Summer School." 

3. Academic Discourse: 
- What do you think of when you hear the words "summer school"?
- What are some specific things that Gary did in summer school?
- How do you think going to summer school shaped Gary's adolescent development?
- What thoughts, reactions, questions, etc. did you have about any part of the reading?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

5/10, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

5/10, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine the central ideas of Living Up the Street, "Summer School" by Gary Soto. 
2. identify the writing strategies that Soto uses to develop key ideas in his narrative.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer What is an energizer question that you would like to ask your class?


2. Asynchronous Learning: Read and annotate "Summer School" by Gary Soto. 


Attached Resources: copy of "Summer School" (Google doc)/copy of "Summer School" (online copy with commentary)/list of universal central ideas and themes in literature/writing strategies refresher/annotation worksheet

3. Discussion Questions--Be sure to explain your answers referring to textual details.
1. Did you find this part of the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4. How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Text-Analysis Response on

Text-Analysis Response on "Desire" (Soto) or "Sorry" (Shange)

Text-Analysis Response on "Desire" (Soto) or "Sorry" (Shange)

Your Task: 

Write a well-developed, text-based response of two to three paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the text and analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text. 

Guidelines:
Be sure to:

Identify a central idea in the text 
Analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary
technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Examples include:
characterization, conflict, denotation/connotation, metaphor, simile, irony,
language use, point-of-view, setting, structure, symbolism, theme, tone, etc. 
Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis 
Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner 
Maintain a formal style of writing 
Follow the conventions of standard written English

Due:

May 3-7 Work Folder in Google Classroom

May 3-7 Work Folder

* Please note: For this week, you will follow an individualized action plan based on your academic progress.


Asynchronous Work (ALL students) 
* Due Fri, May 7th*


Writing Assessment:


Text-Analysis Response 


Your Task: 


Write a well-developed,
text-based response of two to three paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the
text and analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary
technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence
from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text. 


Guidelines:
Be sure to:

Identify a central idea in the text 
Analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary
technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Examples include:
characterization, conflict, denotation/connotation, metaphor, simile, irony,
language use, point-of-view, setting, structure, symbolism, theme, tone, etc. 
Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis 
Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner 
Maintain a formal style of writing 
Follow the conventions of standard written English



Individualized Action Plan (more details will be given in class):

Attend specified virtual class meetings to receive NX coaching and complete previous course assignments.
Attend specified virtual class meetings to make up current coursework, which includes completing missing or incomplete assignments in Google classroom. 
Peer-tutor 
Work on asynchronous assignments

Due:

4/30, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/30, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how to annotate a text.
2. use their annotations to discuss their insights, including central ideas, about the poem "Sorry" by Ntozake Shange.


Learning Standards:
R.L.11.10.  By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed.
R.L.11.3.  Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a literary work.
R.L.11.2.  Determine themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Favorite Pick-Up Line
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1WqRUHLELMo-W72vWh5biy_lSJfChrBMdVwkc4PAb1Pk/edit?usp=sharing

2. Read aloud the poem "Sorry."

3. Mini-Lesson: Review--How to Annotate a Text
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmVAfoXhhPM

4. Academic Discourse: 
Nearpod -- Annotating the poem "Sorry" by Ntozake Shange
https://share.nearpod.com/HmUjJVRPecb


Questions to promote annotations and academic discourse about the text:


In one to two sentences, what is the poem "Sorry" about?
What are your thoughts about the speaker?
What are your thoughts about the speaker's ex?
What word, phrase, line, or stanza resonates with you? Why?
What are your reactions to the poem as a whole?
Is there anything about the speaker's feelings or experiences that you can relate to?
Did you notice the poet's use of any writing devices?
What words or expressions are you unfamiliar with? Take a moment to look up definitions.
What images help you to understand what is going on in the poem?
What is something that you noticed about the poem?  I noticed...
What questions do you have about the poem? I wonder...
What themes or central ideas are conveyed in the poem?


Opt: In breakout rooms, students present their self-annotated copy of the poem "Sorry," and listening to each other, build on their original annotations.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

4/29 Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/29 Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how to annotate text.
2. use their annotations to discuss their insights, including central ideas, about the poem "Sorry" by Ntozake Shange.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: If your best friend just broke up with their partner and came to you for support, what advice would you give?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1R0K7acTCAUaPSzbVTIWo6WHIYoJSqAObrZ6SSrxLB1U/edit?usp=sharing

2. Read aloud the poem "Sorry."

3. Mini-Lesson: Review--How to Annotate a Text
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmVAfoXhhPM

4. Academic Discourse: 
Nearpod -- Annotating the poem "Sorry" by Ntozake Shange

Opt: In breakout rooms, students share their annotations about the poem "Sorry," and listening to each other, build on their original annotations.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

4/28, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/28, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how to annotate text.
2. use their annotations to discuss their insights about the poem "Sorry" by Ntozake Shange.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: When was the last time you apologized to someone or someone apologized to you?  What happened?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1Ang89213FH1RAiOMAU4QcR3LxtCYPZFiGaE1DZDw5j8/edit?usp=sharing


2. Read aloud the poem "Sorry."

3. Mini-Lesson: Review--How to Annotate a Text
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmVAfoXhhPM


4. Teacher Annotation Model/Demonstration

5. In breakout rooms, students share their annotations about the poem "Sorry," and listening to each other, build on their original annotations.


6. Class share out

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

"Sorry" by Ntozke Shange

Read and annotate the poem "Sorry."


Annotations can include summaries, questions, reactions, personal connections, identification of author's writing strategies, important ideas, vocabulary words and definitions, pictures, etc.

Due:

4/26-4/27 Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/26-4/27 Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to read and annotate the poem "Sorry" by Ntozake Shange. 

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: What is the toughest obstacle that you've ever had to overcome?  Write in the Zoom chat box.


2. Mini-Lesson: How to Annotate a Text
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmVAfoXhhPM

3. Asynchronous Learning: Read and annotate "Sorry" by Gary Soto. 
* Please submit your annotations in Google classroom/Homework section/"Sorry" Annotations

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

4/23, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/23, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain how writing strategies are used to develop key ideas in Soto's narrative "Desire." (continued)

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: How many four or more- letter words can you make with the letters in the word _________?  A pluralized word (adding "-s") will not count as a separate word.  (Sorry)  One winner will get 1 extra grade point! 

2. Mini-Lesson: The Purpose of Using Writing Strategies to Convey Ideas
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eN0dwIdqYmo

3. Activity:
* Writing Strategies Scavenger Hunt 
In teams:
- Find an example of the writing strategy in the text.  
- Explain the idea that the writing strategy conveys.
- Prepare to share with the rest of the class.


4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

4/22, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/22, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to
1. determine a central idea of Living Up The Street, "Desire."
2. identify writing strategies that Soto uses in his narrative.
3. explain how these writing strategies convey key ideas.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1I7Wnfaw8SjRFI0XggnwDZcy6WsKOmIVwdBth2xcDuKc/edit?usp=sharing


Name That Tune - Love Songs =)

2. Mini-Lesson: The Purpose of Using Writing Strategies to Convey Ideas
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eN0dwIdqYmo

3. Activity:
* Writing Strategies Scavenger Hunt 
In teams:
- Find an example of the writing strategy in the text.  
- Explain the idea that the writing strategy conveys.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

4/21, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/21, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand and explain how Soto uses literary elements and writing techniques to develop central ideas of his narrative "Desire."  (continued)

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Nearpod 

1. Energizer: What is your favorite "love" song?  
Go ahead... tell me in the Zoom chat.

2. Reread "Desire," paragraphs 1-4. 


3. Student Writing Sample (Memoir Discussion Questions)

4. Academic Discourse: 
- What does the word "desire" mean?
- Is the title a literal or figurative (symbolic) title?
- How did Gary's "desire" change from fifth grade to sixth grade?
- What challenges did Gary face in trying to gain the interest of his "desire"?
- How does Soto use various writing strategies to develop key ideas in this chapter?
- What claim can you make about the idea of "desire" based on paragraphs 1-4?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

4/20, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/20, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand and explain how Soto uses literary elements and writing techniques to develop central ideas of his narrative "Desire."

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Nearpod 

1. Energizer: If you could have any three wishes granted, what would they be?  

2. Reread "Desire," paragraphs 1-2. 

3. Academic Discourse: 
- What does the word "desire" mean?
- Is the title a literal or figurative (symbolic) title?
- How did Gary's "desire" change from fifth grade to sixth grade?
- What challenges did Gary face in trying to gain the interest of his "desire"?
- What claim can you make about the idea of "desire" based on paragraphs 1-2?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

"Desire" by Gary Soto/Memoir Discussion Questions

Memoir Discussion Questions--Be sure to explain your answers referring to textual details.
1. Did you find this part of the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4. How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

Due:

4/19, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/19, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine the central ideas of Living Up the Street, "Desire" by Gary Soto. 
2. identify the writing strategies that Soto uses to develop key ideas in his narrative.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: If you were to make a movie about your life, what genre (action, comedy, thriller, romance, drama, science-fiction, musical, documentary, etc.) would it be? 
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1NkJG2iWXRhInQJhZlFsd70IiTY2wp9q36pC0MRw8ZNY/edit?usp=sharing


2. Asynchronous Learning: Read and annotate "Desire" by Gary Soto. 


Attached Resources: copy of "Desire" (Google doc)/copy of "Desire" (online copy with commentary)/list of universal central ideas and themes in literature/writing strategies refresher/annotation worksheet

3. Discussion Questions--Be sure to explain your answers referring to textual details.
1. Did you find this part of the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4. How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?
* Please submit your work in Google classroom/Homework section/"Desire" Memoir Discussion Questions

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

4/16, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/16, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. identify writing strategies that Soto uses in his narrative "Deceit."
2. explain how these writing strategies convey ideas and develop the story.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1unh4vjE7upaB3Q13HW0uEcqrQAFN6h95-B--IJgcmHQ/edit?usp=sharing


2. Review/Complete yesterday's Nearpod on the Central Idea of "Deceit"

Academic Discourse: 
- What does the word "deceit" mean?
- Is the title a hyperbole (an exaggeration) or a literal title?
- How did Gary, as a child, engage in "deceit"?
- Why do you think Gary engaged in "deceitful" behaviors?  https://www.brighthorizons.com/family-resources/why-children-lie-and-how-to-respond
- What claim can you make about the idea of "deceit" based on Soto's narrative?

3. Mini-Lesson: The Purpose of Using Writing Strategies to Convey Ideas

hyperbole/characterization/paradox

hyperbole -- an exaggerated statement or claim not meant to be taken literally 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lFb1v63qHk

paradox -- a statement that may seem contradictory itself but can be true (or at least make sense)

4. Discussion: What examples of these writing strategies have you seen used in books, songs, or cinema?

5. Practice using these writing strategies to convey ideas more powerfully and creatively.

6. Writing Strategies Scavenger Hunt
- Find an example of the writing strategy in the text.  
- Explain the idea that the writing strategy conveys.

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

4/15, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/15, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand how the author Soto develops a central idea of his narrative "Deceit".

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: "Two Truths and a Lie" -- In random order, write two statements about yourself that are true and one statement that is false.  Your classmates will try to guess which statement is the lie.  Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: The Central Idea of "Deceit"
https://www.brighthorizons.com/family-resources/why-children-lie-and-how-to-respond

3. Nearpod 
Academic Discourse: 
- What does the word "deceit" mean?
- Is the title a hyperbole (an exaggeration) or a literal title?
- How did Gary, as a child, engage in "deceit"?
- Why do you think Gary engaged in "deceitful" behaviors?
- What claim can you make about the idea of "deceit" based on Soto's narrative?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

4/12-4/13 Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/12-4/13 Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to support a central idea of "Looking for Work" with relevant evidence and clear analysis.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Energizer: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1WIpbyZOX-kbLAMmX84nVgfUVykq_WjhxIBsbOB3zJG4/edit?usp=sharing


Asynchronous Learning: 


Review chapter 4: "Looking for Work."

Write a text analysis response on the central idea of work.  Please submit your response in the Writing Assessments Folder.


Read chapter 5: "Deceit."
https://nowcomment.com/documents/39365

Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

The Central Idea of Work (Living Up the Street/

The Central Idea of Work (Living Up the Street/"Looking for Work")

Short Response -- Support the following central idea statement, providing specific and relevant evidence from the text. Be sure to explain your ideas fully. Refer to the attached resource: The TEAL strategy for writing.

The Central Idea of Work

Work is important to children because it provides them with a sense of accomplishment.

Due:

4/9, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/9, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to identify and explain various writing strategies that Soto uses to convey ideas in his narrative "Looking for Work."

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Would you rather have unlimited first-class plane tickets or never have to pay for food at restaurants?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1-yASk1F7_0YVrb1k3-vRXzBJIoilu_DCO-Poihp5Rxc/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: Review--The Purpose of Using Writing Strategies to Convey Ideas
Allusion/Imagery/Characterization

Practice: Use the writing strategy ____________ to __________________________.
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1FDpXzlHf4H4IAg1oReiRHrqpZjr7zx7qWP3UqVKKBcA/edit?usp=sharing
Ideas:
- convey a disastrous event.
- tell me about how your day is going.
- describe your best friend.

3. Differentiated Activities: 

* Writing Strategies Scavenger Hunt 
- Find an example of the writing strategy in the text.  
- Explain the idea that the writing strategy conveys.

* Student Collaboration-- Shamar & Stephanie
Plan and facilitate a lesson that promotes an understanding of a central idea and a writing strategy that Soto uses in his narrative "Looking for Work."  (Lesson Plan template attached.)

*Breakout Room with Ms. Kane Moran for teacher guided small group support with the writing strategy scavenger hunt. 

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Edpuzzle - Allusions in Google Classroom

Edpuzzle - Allusions

Due:

4/8, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/8, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine a central idea of Living Up The Street, "Looking for Work."
2. identify writing strategies that Soto uses in his narrative.
3. explain how these writing strategies convey key ideas.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Would you rather lose the ability to lie or always believe everything you hear?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1w5HCqogNdfka7NblhujxTxXJ_hhBjXyNJy0pfqZeSHI/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: The Purpose of Using Writing Strategies to Convey Ideas - EdPuzzle Live or Asynchronous

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWFR_pZ2jBg

Allusion--an implied or indirect reference to an object (a person, literary work, TV show, song, place, historical event, etc.)  Allusions are based on the assumption that there is a body of knowledge that is shared by the author and the reader and that therefore the reader will understand the author's intended meaning.

3. Differentiated Activities: 

* Writing Strategies Scavenger Hunt 
- Find an example of the writing strategy in the text.  
- Explain the idea that the writing strategy conveys.

* Student Collaboration--
Plan and facilitate a lesson that promotes an understanding of a central idea and a writing strategy that Soto uses in his narrative "Looking for Work."  (Lesson Plan template attached.)

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Summative Assessment in Google Classroom

Summative Assessment

Copy and paste your written response in this Google Doc INSTEAD of pressing "submit" on problemattic.  This will save your response so you can add to it tomorrow.

Due:

4/5, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

4/5, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine the central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 4: "Looking For Work." 
2. identify the writing strategies that Soto uses to develop key ideas in his narrative.


* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.


Agenda:


1. Energizer: https://jamboard.google.com/d/15TCKIu3U9eOaWJd3D8FbwVMyr318H8Um4zyaAX2nUAY/edit?usp=sharing


2. Asynchronous Learning: Read chapter 4: "Looking for Work."


3. Discussion Questions--Be sure to explain your answers referring to textual details.
1. Did you find this part of the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4. How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?


4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/26, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/26, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine a central idea of Living Up The Street, chapter 3.
2. identify writing strategies that Soto uses in his narrative.
3. explain how these writing strategies convey key ideas.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Nearpod

1. Energizer: Fill in the blank: I sometimes imagine...
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1ENz0Yg3zufLl9DxM-QE26gco_118Z4XKG_uj1QPcc08/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: The Function of Various Writing Strategies--juxtaposition
https://self-publishingschool.com/literary-devices/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaYPoeMJECg

3. Activity: Continuation of Analysis of Writing Strategies in Living Up the Street, chapter 3: "1, 2, 3"(paragraphs 70-100)
* Identify the writing strategy being used.
* Provide example or quote, including a citation.
* Explain the author's purpose for using the writing strategy.
-Breakout room with Ms. Kane Moran for small group support for the last Collaborate board/Writing Strategy Organizer entry-

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/25, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/25, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine a central idea of Living Up The Street, chapter 3.
2. identify writing strategies that Soto uses in his narrative.
3. explain how these writing strategies convey key ideas.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Nearpod

1. Energizer: (in Nearpod today)

2. Mini-Lesson: The Function of Various Writing Strategies--onomatopoeia/imagery/dialogue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaYPoeMJECg

3. Activity: Analysis of Writing Strategies in Living Up the Street, chapter 3: "1, 2, 3" (paragraphs 70-100)
* Identify the writing strategy being used.
* Provide example or quote, including a citation.
* Explain the author's purpose for using the writing strategy.
-Breakout room with Ms. Kane Moran for small group support for the last Collaborate board/Writing Strategy Organizer entry-

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/24, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/24, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of "jealousy among siblings" in chapter 3.
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop key ideas in the story.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

Nearpod

1. Energizer:
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1DJV85Z8GSRFNvp19bFFZvYxD_ZMMrFbCF1axyA_vkos/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: The Central Idea of Jealousy Among Siblings
* Young children can easily become consumed with jealousy, especially when other children are given preferential treatment.

3. Supporting a Central Idea with Textual Evidence

4. Short Response -- Support the central idea statement, providing specific and relevant evidence from the text. Be sure to explain your ideas fully. *Breakout Room with Ms. Kane for small group support with writing*

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/23, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/23, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. identify the writing strategies that Soto uses in chapter 3, "1, 2, 3."
2. explain how these writing strategies convey key ideas.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1gR2crEVtmdPpnPvfb1wETjmLw8XaY1OhFzPRO3L9oH8/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: The Function of Various Writing Strategies--simile/imagery/dialogue/allusion
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaYPoeMJECg

3. Activity: Analysis of Writing Strategies in Living Up the Street, chapter 3: "1, 2, 3"
* Identify the writing strategy being used.
* Provide example or quote, including a citation.
* Explain the author's purpose for using the writing strategy.
-Breakout Room with Ms. Kane Moran for small group work-

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/22, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/22, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine the central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 3: "1, 2, 3" (paragraphs 43-69).
2. identify the writing strategies that Soto uses to develop key ideas in his narrative.

* Please take notes in a handwritten or digital notepad.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Which TV or movie character do you most identify with, and why? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Asynchronous Learning: Read the rest of chapter 3: "1, 2, 3."

3. Living Up the Street, chapter 3: "1, 2, 3" (paragraphs 43-69)
Discussion Questions--Be sure to explain your answers referring to textual details.
1. Did you find this part of the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4. How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/19, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/19, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to write a literary response determining a central idea of Living Up the Street by Gary Soto.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: If you could have either unlimited time or unlimited money, which would you choose and why?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1Ll9qLq0t6fdsH4_vqfJw-odmRQKNa7TARtIiGVk77DQ/edit?usp=sharing

2. Asynchronous Learning:
* Finish writing your short response on the central idea of repressed feelings.
* Reading: Living Up the Street, "1, 2, 3" (par. 43-100)

3. Chapter 3 Memoir Discussion Questions
1. Did you find the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his or her story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4.How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/18, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/18, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to write a literary response determining a central idea of Living Up the Street by Gary Soto.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Would you rather have 20 million YouTube subscribers or produce a blockbuster movie?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1MjLoJBFy5wbe25oQRvpP-GHMDXEieglVII3PpK2cZnI/edit?usp=sharing

2. Asynchronous Learning:
* Finish writing your short response on the central idea of repressed feelings.
* Reading: Living Up the Street, "1, 2, 3" (par. 43-100)

3. Chapter 3 Memoir Discussion Questions
1. Did you find the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his or her story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4.How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/17, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/17, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of implicit/explicit biases in his narrative "1, 2, 3."
2. write a literary response using the TEAL strategy.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1sr_0gyt0rDz7QSW78olUb6oNw-73SacCvl52m9idbGY/edit?usp=sharing

2. Review: The Central Idea of Implicit/Explicit Biases
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEKd_7QL-q8

3. Discussion -- Personal connections, thoughts, or experiences

4. Review TEAL strategy for writing a short response.

5. Nearpod Collaborate Boards
* Topic Sentence
* Elaborate--Evidence/Examples
* Analysis
* Link

Breakout room with Ms. Kane Moran for small group work.

Sentence Starters:
A central idea of Gary Soto's narrative, "1, 2, 3" is...
This central idea is best demonstrated when...
This example conveys implicit/explicit bias because...

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

The Central Idea of Repressed Feelings in Google Classroom

The Central Idea of Repressed Feelings

Short Response -- Support the following central idea statement, providing specific and relevant evidence from the text. Be sure to explain your ideas fully. Refer to the attached resource: The TEAL strategy for writing.

The Central Idea of Repressed Feelings

People, especially young children, sometimes repress their feelings because they are unable to express how they feel during times of tragedy.

Due:

3/16, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/16, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of implicit biases/racism in his narrative "1, 2, 3."
2. write a literary response using the TEAL strategy.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: What is one of your favorite ethnic foods? https://jamboard.google.com/d/1o_znrLPfxJLfldiCYRz3lC17a9yRCl34E1bT2vlqrzA/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: The Central Idea of Implicit Biases
https://perception.org/research/implicit-bias/

3. Discussion -- Personal connections, thoughts, or experiences

4. Review TEAL strategy for writing a short response.

5. Nearpod Collaborate Boards
* Topic Sentence
* Elaborate--Evidence/Examples
* Analysis
* Link

Sentence Starters:
A central idea of Gary Soto's narrative, "1, 2, 3" is...
This central idea is best demonstrated when...
This example conveys implicit bias because...

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/15, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/15, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine the central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 3: "1, 2, 3."
2. identify the writing strategies that Soto uses to develop key ideas in his narrative.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer:
Buzz the Number--
This is a counting game that focuses on skip-counting and multiples. Identify a multiple you want to practice. With all cameras turned off, students begin counting off in turn from the number one. When a number in that sequence is reached – the student says their number followed by the word ‘BUZZ’, and then turns on their camera. The goal is to move from one student to the other as quickly as possible without making a mistake – until no one is with their camera off. Once a student turns on their camera, they are out of that round. If a student forgets to BUZZ the number, reset the game and start back from one.

Ex. If you are practicing multiples of three, your game will start like this: 1, 2, 3-BUZZ! (student turns on camera), 4, 5, 6-BUZZ! (student turns on camera), 7, 8, 9-BUZZ! (student turns on camera) etc.

Try variating the game by playing with more than one multiple at a time or counting backwards in sequence.

2. Asynchronous Learning: Reading
Living Up the Street, chapter 3: "1, 2, 3" by Gary Soto (par. 25-42)
**Breakout room with Ms. Kane during class for small group support with the reading or the Central Idea Response**

Finish writing your short response on the central idea of repressed feelings.

3. Chapter 3 Memoir Discussion Questions--Be sure to explain your answers referring to textual details.
1. Did you find the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his or her story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4.How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/12, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/12, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of repressed feelings in his narrative "Father."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop key ideas in the story.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod

1. Energizer: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1aH3yXtnBr23YgjnSiuwbfgKYkBOmyDdpDzlUlwghZf0/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: The Central Idea of Repressed Feelings
* People, especially young children, sometimes repress their feelings because they are unable to express how they feel during times of tragedy.

3. Supporting a Central Idea with Textual Evidence

4. Short Response -- Support the central idea statement, providing specific and relevant evidence from the text. Be sure to explain your ideas fully.
Writing Frame: A central idea of Gary Soto's narrative, "Living up the Street" is young children sometimes repress their feelings because they are unable to express how they feel during times of tragedy. In chapter 2, "Father", this central idea is best demonstrated when.... This example conveys repressed feelings because...

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/11, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/11, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand how literary elements and techniques are used to develop key ideas in Soto's narrative "Father."

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: If you had to delete all but three apps from your phone, which ones would you keep?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1p8ZBD3mrKb-xsdF2fsLdhZx-39EcEC4zAFp2OuXLwc4/edit?usp=sharing

Nearpod

2. Collaborate Discussion Boards

3. Writing Assessment & Review
*Direct message Ms. Kane Moran for a sentence starter*

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/10, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/10, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to support a central idea in Living Up the Street, chapter 2: "Father," using specific and relevant textual details.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Jamboard- https://jamboard.google.com/d/1MSnU6TsZUEHjdBTuoVy6X7_IySpixHykL5pw56NIVMk/edit?usp=sharing

2. Do Now: Describe a moment that was bittersweet for you. Write in the Zoom chat box.

3. Work Period (in groups) --
Supporting a Central Idea with Evidence

* Father-Son Relationship - What kind of relationship did Gary have with his father?
Team Members: Sorayah, Tasnim, Kyle, Nyece, Nashawn

* Work - How did Gary's early memory of work make him feel?
Team Members: Jaleel, Evan, Shamar, Dontae, Maimuna

* Unconditional Love and Support - How did Gary's family and relatives always provide each other with love and support?
Team Members: Sammy, Scarlet, Jazzy, Ryan

* Hidden Feelings - How did Gary react to his father's death?
Team Members: Michael, Cyann, Stephanie

4. Share out

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/9, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/9, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to gather evidence to support a central idea in Living Up the Street, chapter 2: "Father."

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer/Do Now:
After reading Soto's narrative "Father," can you reflect on your own relationship with your father, mother, or guardian? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Reading:
Living Up the Street, chapter 2: "Father" by Gary Soto
Record your audio reading on Flipgrid.
https://flipgrid.com/3e60d79c

3. Supporting a Central Idea with Evidence

* Father-Son Relationship - What kind of relationship did Gary have with his father?
Team Facilitators: Sorayah, Tasnim, Kyle, Nyece, Nashawn

* Work - How did Gary's early memory of work make him feel?
Team Facilitators: Jaleel, Evan, Shamar, Dontae, Maimuna

* Unconditional Love and Support - How did Gary's family and relatives always provide each other with love and support?
Team Facilitator: Sammy, Scarlet, Jazzy, Ryan

* Hidden Feelings - How did Gary react to his father's death?
Team Facilitators: Michael, Cyann, Stephanie

4. Share out

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Chapter 2:

Chapter 2: "Father" by Gary Soto/Memoir Discussion Questions

Memoir Discussion Questions
1. Did you find the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his or her story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4.How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

Due:

3/8, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/8, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine the central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 2: "Father."
2. identify the writing strategies that Soto uses to develop key ideas in his narrative.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Name one influential person in your life and explain how he or she has impacted you. Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Asynchronous Learning: Reading
Living Up the Street, chapter 2: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto
Record your audio reading on Flipgrid. https://flipgrid.com/s/WpwkRG-zYfbsWEKM

3. Chapter 2 Memoir Discussion Questions--Be sure to explain your answers referring to textual details.
1. Did you find the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his or her story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4.How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Living Up the Street, chapter 1

Living Up the Street, chapter 1 "Being Mean" Student Lesson

Design a lesson based on a central idea in chapter 1.

Due:

3/5, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/5, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea that "a person can be defined by how he/she/they has fun" in his narrative "Being Mean."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his story.
3. determine other central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by designing and facilitating their own lessons.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate Shamar Taylor.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Please see the Nearpod

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization

3. Gathering evidence from the text: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto

4. Activities: Collaborate Boards

5. Assessment: Time to Climb

6. Feedback Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfL44VXLOfwTvgcRdDAF9SFKOvqGSNTVRVFU-Q81U--RvpEIA/viewform?usp=sf_link
Breakout Room with Ms. Kane Moran

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.
................................................................................

Teacher Model Lesson (cont.):

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of the differences in parenting styles in his narrative "Being Mean."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his story.
3. determine other central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by designing and facilitating their own lessons.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook

Nearpod:

1. Energizer

2. Review article on the four types of parenting styles.
Four Types of Parenting: Authoritarian/Authoritative/Permissive/Uninvolved
https://www.verywellfamily.com/types-of-parenting-styles-1095045

3. Gathering and analyzing evidence from the text: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto

4. Roleplay & Discussion --
If Mother Soto/Molina were a(n) authoritarian/authoritative/permissive/uninvolved parent, how would she respond to Gary if he _________________________?
How do you think Gary would respond to this style of parenting?

5. Assessment: Short Response --
Compose a claim about one or more of the parenting styles as evident in the text "Being Mean." Support your claim with evidence from the text. Be sure to provide thorough analysis of the evidence.

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/4, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/4, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea that "your actions have consequences" in his narrative "Being Mean."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his story.
3. determine other central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by designing and facilitating their own lessons.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate Stephanie Lewis.

Agenda:

1. Energizer

2. Mini-Lesson

3. Gathering evidence from the text: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto

4. Activities

5. Assessment

6. Feedback Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfL44VXLOfwTvgcRdDAF9SFKOvqGSNTVRVFU-Q81U--RvpEIA/viewform?usp=sf_link
Breakout Room with Ms. Kane Moran

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.
................................................................................

Teacher Model Lesson (cont.):

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of the differences in parenting styles in his narrative "Being Mean."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his story.
3. determine other central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by designing and facilitating their own lessons.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook

Nearpod:

1. Energizer

2. Review article on the four types of parenting styles.
Four Types of Parenting: Authoritarian/Authoritative/Permissive/Uninvolved
https://www.verywellfamily.com/types-of-parenting-styles-1095045

3. Gathering and analyzing evidence from the text: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto

4. Roleplay & Discussion --
If Mother Soto/Molina were a(n) authoritarian/authoritative/permissive/uninvolved parent, how would she respond to Gary if he _________________________?
How do you think Gary would respond to this style of parenting?

5. Assessment: Short Response --
Compose a claim about one or more of the parenting styles as evident in the text "Being Mean." Support your claim with evidence from the text. Be sure to provide thorough analysis of the evidence.

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/3, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/3, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of __________ in his narrative "Being Mean."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his story.
3. determine other central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by designing and facilitating their own lessons.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate __________.

Agenda:

1. Energizer

2. Mini-Lesson

3. Gathering evidence from the text: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto

4. Activities

5. Assessment

6. Feedback Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfL44VXLOfwTvgcRdDAF9SFKOvqGSNTVRVFU-Q81U--RvpEIA/viewform?usp=sf_link

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.
................................................................................

Teacher Model Lesson:

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of the differences in parenting styles in his narrative "Being Mean."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his story.
3. determine other central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by designing and facilitating their own lessons.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook

Nearpod:

1. Energizer

2. Mini-Lesson: The Central Idea of Parenting Styles
Four Types of Parenting: Authoritarian/Authoritative/Permissive/Uninvolved
https://www.verywellfamily.com/types-of-parenting-styles-1095045

3. Gathering evidence from the text: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto

4. Activities:
Collaborative Discussion Boards

5. Feedback Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfL44VXLOfwTvgcRdDAF9SFKOvqGSNTVRVFU-Q81U--RvpEIA/viewform?usp=sf_link

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/2 Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/2 Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of __________ in his narrative "Being Mean."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his story.
3. determine other central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by designing and facilitating their own lessons.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate __________!

Agenda:

1. Energizer

2. Mini-Lesson

3. Gathering evidence from the text: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto

4. Activities

5. Assessment

6. Feedback Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfL44VXLOfwTvgcRdDAF9SFKOvqGSNTVRVFU-Q81U--RvpEIA/viewform?usp=sf_link

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.
................................................................................

SAMPLE:

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of friendship in his narrative "Being Mean."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his story.
3. determine other central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by designing and facilitating their own lessons.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Today's lesson was created and is being facilitated by your classmate Jonathan John!

Agenda:

Nearpod:

1. Energizer

2. Mini-Lesson: The Central Idea of Friendship --
Early childhood friendships play an important role in a person's social and emotional development.

What is friendship? youtube video

3. Gathering evidence from the text: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto

4. Activities:
Collaborative Discussion Boards

5. Assessment: Quiz

6. Feedback Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfL44VXLOfwTvgcRdDAF9SFKOvqGSNTVRVFU-Q81U--RvpEIA/viewform?usp=sf_link

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

3/1, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

3/1, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine the central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean."
2. identify the writing strategies that Soto uses to develop key ideas in his narrative.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: What is one word or sentence that depicts a central idea of this past year 2020? If you were to write about this central idea, what is one writing strategy that you would use to convey your thoughts?
Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review reading: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto

3. Discussion Questions:
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1YRuZftwPjvbArT97_dSTd1jRCgt9J8TufWpX9BrlXNA/edit?usp=sharing

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/26, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/26, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. understand how the author Soto develops the central idea of culture in his narrative "Being Mean."
2. analyze how Soto uses writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his story.
3. determine other central ideas of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by designing and facilitating their own lessons.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: What is one aspect of your culture that other people of other cultures might not understand?
Jamboard: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1ZDoXrklCzI93JNnZ4W4zb9Qt-OfBTyycNFBcnzMVy5Y/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: The Central Idea of Culture --
Gary Soto's culture played an important role in his early childhood.

What is culture? youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fL5WzpuvXfY

3. Review reading: Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean" by Gary Soto
*Breakout room opportunity with Ms. Kane Moran if needed*

4. Activities: Nearpod
Collaborative Discussion Boards
Breakout Rooms
Writing Assessment

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/24, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/24, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to compose and facilitate a lesson to...
1. determine a central idea of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean."
2. analyze the author Gary Soto's use of writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his narrative.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod (self-paced): HSLWN

1. Energizer: What is your philosophy on life?

2. Review: Developing a Lesson on chapter 1: "Being Mean"

3. Breakout Rooms

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/22, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/22, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. determine a central idea of Living Up the Street, chapter 1: "Being Mean."
2. analyze the author Gary Soto's use of writing strategies to develop and relate elements of his narrative.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: What do you remember most about your childhood? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Introduction to the author Gary Soto
https://poets.org/poet/gary-soto
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tX9NUM74CY

3. Memoir Discussion Questions
1. Did you find the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his or her story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4.How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

4. Asynchronous Assignment
1. Read and annotate Soto's narrative "Being Mean."
2. Respond to the memoir discussion questions.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

"Being Mean" by Gary Soto/Memoir Discussion Questions

Memoir Discussion Questions
1. Did you find the author's story compelling?
2. What do you think motivated the author to share his or her story?
3. What did you think of the author's voice and style?
4.How did the memoir make you reflect on your own life?

Due:

2/11, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/11, Thurs. Work Folder

Topic: Narrative Writing

Learning Objective: Students will use a variety of techniques to write a narrative that conveys a central idea.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What are you looking forward to doing during the mid-winter break? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions
* Please remember to submit your narrative in the Writing Assessment/Personal Narrative pocket.

3. Mini-Lesson: Writing a narrative to convey a central idea
Central Idea: Hard work pays off.
Narrative writing techniques: snapshots, thought-shots, explode the moment, create a scene, asking questions

4. Asynchronous or group work: Planning and writing a narrative to convey a central idea.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/10, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/10, Wed. Work Folder

Topic: Narrative Writing

Learning Objective: Students will use a variety of techniques to write a narrative that conveys a central idea.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What is one life lesson that has been passed down to you from your parents? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions
* Please remember to submit your narrative in the Writing Assessment/Personal Narrative pocket.
**Breakout rooms with Ms. Kane Moran for individual check ins on narrative and term 2 progress**

3. Mini-Lesson: Writing a narrative to convey a central idea
Central Idea: Hard work pays off.
Narrative writing techniques: snapshots, thought-shots, explode the moment, create a scene, asking questions

4. Asynchronous or group work: Planning and writing a narrative to convey a central idea.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/9, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/9, Tues. Work Folder

Topic: Narrative Writing

Unit Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Understand the various strategies that authors use to write stories.
2. Use these various techniques (i.e., snapshots, thought-shots, explode the moment, create a scene) to write a personal narrative.
3. Read their narratives out loud and employ questions to revise their writing.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What is your favorite quote from a movie? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review Quiz: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdAj61ZyHrcdBWqS-Q2NOiHt6n6QprJU4o0cCHHO-ZKHWxwbQ/viewform?usp=sf_link

3. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

* Please remember to submit your narrative in the Writing Assessment/Personal Narrative pocket.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/8, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/8, Mon. Work Folder

Topic: Narrative Writing

Unit Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Understand the various strategies that authors use to write stories.
2. Use these various techniques (i.e., snapshots, thought-shots, explode the moment, create a scene) to write a personal narrative.
3. Read their narratives out loud and employ questions to revise their writing.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What is your favorite scene in a movie? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Quiz: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdAj61ZyHrcdBWqS-Q2NOiHt6n6QprJU4o0cCHHO-ZKHWxwbQ/viewform?usp=sf_link
*Breakout Room with Ms. Kane Moran*

3. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

* Please remember to submit your narrative in the Writing Assessment/Personal Narrative pocket.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/5, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/5, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Use various techniques to write a personal narrative.
2. Read their narratives out loud and employ questions to revise their writing.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: Watch the following video clip.
In a brief narrative, use the "explode the moment" technique to tell what happens prior to the big revelation.

2. Review: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

3. Assignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

4. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/4, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/4, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that they experienced during the fall semester.
2. Revise their writing guided by teacher and peer feedback.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod nearpod.com

1. Energizer

2. Review: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

3. Asignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

4. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Personal Narrative in Google Classroom

Personal Narrative

Narrative Writing Techniques:

1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshots - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene *see attached document for a reminder of these strategies we've discussed and practiced in class*
5. Questions - Anticipate questions that your readers might ask

* Assignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

Due:

2/3, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/3, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that they experienced during the fall semester.
2. Revise their writing guided by teacher and peer feedback.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod nearpod.com

1. Energizer: What is Kanye thinking? Write a "thoughtshot" for him in Zoom chat.

2. Review: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

3. Asignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

4. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

2/2, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

2/2, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. Write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that they experienced during the fall semester.
2. Revise their writing guided by teacher and peer feedback.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What is your favorite fairytale or children's story? Respond in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a character and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene
5. Questions

3. Asignment: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester.

4. Sharing of personal narratives/Asking questions

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/27, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/27, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that they experienced during the fall semester.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: On a blank sheet of paper, free-write continuously for five minutes. Write down whatever is on your mind. You may choose to express your thoughts in full sentences, phrases, and single words. You may write in any language you want. Don't worry about spelling or grammar. It's also okay if your free-writing doesn't seem to make sense. Just free-write for five minutes without stopping.

2. Mini-Lesson: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a characters and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene

3. Asynchronous Learning: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/25, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/25, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that they experienced during the fall semester.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: On a blank sheet of paper, free-write continuously for five minutes. Write down whatever is on your mind. You may choose to express your thoughts in full sentences, phrases, and single words. You may write in any language you want. Don't worry about spelling or grammar. It's also okay if your free-writing doesn't seem to make sense. Just free-write for five minutes without stopping.

2. Mini-Lesson: Strategies for Writing a Narrative
1. Snapshots - "Zoom in and stretch"; focus on close physical detail and sensations
2. Thoughtshot - move inside a characters and show what he or she is feeling
3. Exploding a Moment - stretch the exciting seconds of your story into what seems like hours, creating suspense for the reader
to savor
4. Making a Scene - Use all elements of narrative writing (action, dialogue, Snaphots, and Thoughtshots) to create a balanced
scene

3. Asynchronous Learning: Using the strategies discussed, write a personal narrative about a significant moment or event that you experienced during the fall semester

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

1/22, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/22, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will evaluate sample argument essays on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Tell your favorite joke or riddle. Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review:
Guided Questions for Writing/Revising an Argument Essay:
1. What is your position on the topic?
2. What reason can you give to support your position?
3. What evidence from any of the texts can you give to support this reason?
4. Where did you find this piece of evidence? Please cite the text # and line #.
5. How does this piece of evidence connect to your argument?
6. Can you give another piece of evidence to support this reason? (Repeat questions 5 and 6).
7. Can you give another reason to support your position? (Repeat questions 3-6).
8. What might the opposing side say against your argument or claims?
9. What would you say in response to these counterclaims?

"Zoom and Stretch" Protocol

3. Discussion: Critiquing Sample Argument Essays
Breakout room with Ms. Kane Moran for small group and individualized assistance

4. Asynchronous Learning: Continue to write/revise your argument essay, using the guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol to help you.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish writing your argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

1/21, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/21, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will evaluate sample argument essays on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Tell your favorite joke or riddle. Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review:
Guided Questions for Writing/Revising an Argument Essay:
1. What is your position on the topic?
2. What reason can you give to support your position?
3. What evidence from any of the texts can you give to support this reason?
4. Where did you find this piece of evidence? Please cite the text # and line #.
5. How does this piece of evidence connect to your argument?
6. Can you give another piece of evidence to support this reason? (Repeat questions 5 and 6).
7. Can you give another reason to support your position? (Repeat questions 3-6).
8. What might the opposing side say against your argument or claims?
9. What would you say in response to these counterclaims?

"Zoom and Stretch" Protocol

3. Discussion: Critiquing Sample Argument Essays
Breakout room with Ms. Kane Moran for small group and individualized assistance

4. Asynchronous Learning: Continue to write/revise your argument essay, using the guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol to help you.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish writing your argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

1/20, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/20, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will evaluate sample argument essays on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Tell your favorite joke or riddle. Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review:
Guided Questions for Writing/Revising an Argument Essay:
1. What is your position on the topic?
2. What reason can you give to support your position?
3. What evidence from any of the texts can you give to support this reason?
4. Where did you find this piece of evidence? Please cite the text # and line #.
5. How does this piece of evidence connect to your argument?
6. Can you give another piece of evidence to support this reason? (Repeat questions 5 and 6).
7. Can you give another reason to support your position? (Repeat questions 3-6).
8. What might the opposing side say against your argument or claims?
9. What would you say in response to these counterclaims?

"Zoom and Stretch" Protocol

3. Discussion: Critiquing Sample Argument Essays
Breakout rooms with Ms. Kane-Moran for small group and individual support.

4. Asynchronous Learning: Continue to write/revise your argument essay, using the guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol to help you.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish writing your argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

1/19, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/19, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will use rubrics to evaluate sample argument essays on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: What is a good icebreaker question that you would want to ask your peers? Share your ideas for a future energizer in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review:
Guided Questions for Writing/Revising an Argument Essay:
1. What is your position on the topic?
2. What reason can you give to support your position?
3. What evidence from any of the texts can you give to support this reason?
4. Where did you find this piece of evidence? Please cite the text # and line #.
5. How does this piece of evidence connect to your argument?
6. Can you give another piece of evidence to support this reason? (Repeat questions 5 and 6).
7. Can you give another reason to support your position? (Repeat questions 3-6).
8. What might the opposing side say against your argument or claims?
9. What would you say in response to these counterclaims?

"Zoom and Stretch" Protocol

3. Rubrics

4. Discussion: Critiquing Sample Argument Essays /Breakout rooms with Ms. Kane-Moran for individualized or small group support

5. Asynchronous Learning: Continue to write/revise your argument essay, using the guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol to help you.

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish writing your argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

1/15, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/15, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will write/revise their argument essay on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations, using guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: 20 Questions - The winner gets a **PuRpLe PeSo**

2. Do Now: Write a process piece informing me of what your experience was like writing your argument essay. Did the guiding questions help you to write/revise your essay? What do you need more help with?

3. Guided Questions for Writing/Revising an Argument Essay:
1. What is your position on the topic?
2. What reason can you give to support your position?
3. What evidence from any of the texts can you give to support this reason?
4. Where did you find this piece of evidence? Please cite the text # and line #.
5. How does this piece of evidence connect to your argument?
6. Can you give another piece of evidence to support this reason? (Repeat questions 5 and 6).
7. Can you give another reason to support your position? (Repeat questions 3-6).
8. What might the opposing side say against your argument or claims?
9. What would you say in response to these counterclaims?

--Breakout Rooms for individualized assistance with Ms. Kane-Moran--

4. "Zoom and Stretch" Protocol

5. Teacher Feedback

6. Asynchronous Learning: Continue to write/revise your argument essay, using the guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol to help you.

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish writing your argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

1/14, Thurs. Work Folder  in Google Classroom

1/14, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will write/revise their argument essay on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations, using guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: 20 Questions

2. Do Now: Write a process piece informing me of what your experience was like writing your argument essay. Did the guiding questions help you to write/revise your essay? What do you need more help with?

3. Guided Questions for Writing/Revising an Argument Essay:
1. What is your position on the topic?

2. What reason can you give to support your position?
3. What evidence from any of the texts can you give to support this reason?
4. Where did you find this piece of evidence? Please cite the text # and line #.
5. How does this piece of evidence connect to your argument?
6. Can you give another piece of evidence to support this reason? (Repeat questions 5 and 6).

7. Can you give another reason to support your position? (Repeat questions 3-6).

8. What might the opposing side say against your argument or claims?
9. What would you say in response to these counterclaims?

4. "Zoom and Stretch" Protocol
Youtube: "Best Close Up Shots in Movies" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rc2urzXP4ok

5. Teacher Feedback

6. Asynchronous Learning: Continue to write/revise your argument essay, using the guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol to help you.

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish writing your argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

1/13, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/13, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will write/revise their argument essay on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations, using guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: 20 Questions

2. Do Now: Write a process piece informing me of what your experience was like writing the first draft of your argument essay. Did the guiding questions help you to write/revise your essay? What do you need more help with?

3. Guided Questions for Writing/Revising an Argument Essay:
1. What is your position on the topic?

2. What reason can you give to support your position?
3. What evidence from any of the texts can you give to support this reason?
4. Where did you find this piece of evidence? Please cite the text # and line #.
5. How does this piece of evidence connect to your argument?
6. Can you give another piece of evidence to support this reason? (Repeat questions 5 and 6).

7. Can you give another reason to support your position? (Repeat questions 3-6).

8. What might the opposing side say against your argument or claims?
9. What would you say in response to these counterclaims?

4. "Zoom and Stretch" Protocol
Youtube: "Best Close Up Shots in Movies" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rc2urzXP4ok

5. Teacher Feedback

6. Asynchronous Learning: Continue to write/revise your argument essay, using the guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol to help you.

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish writing your argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

1/12, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/12, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will write/revise their argument essay on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations, using guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: 20 Questions

2. Do Now: Write a process piece informing me of what your experience was like writing the first draft of your argument essay. Did the guiding questions help you to write/revise your essay? What do you need more help with?

3. Guided Questions for Writing/Revising an Argument Essay:
1. What is your position on the topic?

2. What reason can you give to support your position?
3. What evidence from any of the texts can you give to support this reason?
4. Where did you find this piece of evidence? Please cite the text # and line #.
5. How does this piece of evidence connect to your argument?
6. Can you give another piece of evidence to support this reason? (Repeat questions 5 and 6).

7. Can you give another reason to support your position? (Repeat questions 3-6).

8. What might the opposing side say against your argument or claims?
9. What would you say in response to these counterclaims?

4. "Zoom and Stretch" Protocol
Youtube: "Best Close Up Shots in Movies" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rc2urzXP4ok

5. Asynchronous Learning: Continue to write/revise your argument essay, using the guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol to help you.

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish writing your argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

1/11, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/11, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will write/revise their argument essay on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations, using guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: 20 Questions

2. Do Now: Write a process piece informing me of what your experience was like writing your argument essay. What steps did you take? Did you have any challenges? If you did not complete it, please explain your reason.

3. Guided Questions for Writing/Revising an Argument Essay:
1. What is your position on the topic?

2. What reason can you give to support your position?
3. What evidence from any of the texts can you give to support this reason?
4. Where did you find this piece of evidence? Please cite the text # and line #.
5. How does this piece of evidence connect to your argument?
6. Can you give another piece of evidence to support this reason? (Repeat questions 5 and 6).

7. Can you give another reason to support your position? (Repeat questions 3-6).

8. What might the opposing side say against your argument or claims?
9. What would you say in response to these counterclaims?

4. "Zoom and Stretch" Protocol
Youtube: "Best Close Up Shots in Movies" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rc2urzXP4ok

5. Asynchronous Learning: Continue to write/revise your argument essay, using the guided questions and the "zoom and stretch" protocol to help you.

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish writing your argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

Argument Essay: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations? in Google Classroom

Argument Essay: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Argument Essay

Directions: Closely read each of the four texts provided on pages 12 through 19 and write a source-based
argument on the topic below.

Topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Your Task: Carefully read each of the four texts provided. Then, using evidence from at least three of the texts,
write a well-developed argument regarding whether or not the United States government should create strict
sugar regulations. Clearly establish your claim, distinguish your claim from alternate or opposing claims, and use
specific, relevant, and sufficient evidence from at least three of the texts to develop your argument. Do not
simply summarize each text.

Guidelines:
Be sure to:
• Establish your claim regarding whether or not the United States government should create strict sugar
regulations
• Distinguish your claim from alternate or opposing claims
• Use specific, relevant, and sufficient evidence from at least three of the texts to develop your argument
• Identify each source that you reference by text number and line number(s) or graphic (for example:
Text 1, line 4 or Text 2, graphic)
• Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
• Maintain a formal style of writing
• Follow the conventions of standard written English

Texts:
Text 1 – FDA Urged to Regulate Sugar in Drinks
Text 2 – Sugar Should Be Regulated As Toxin, Researchers Say
Text 3 – The Toxic Truth About Sugar
Text 4 – Sugar Taxes Are Unfair and Unhealthy

**You may choose to use either the graphic organizer or the writing template (make a copy and paste to a new google doc) to guide your essay response.**

Due:

1/8, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/8, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will read text 4, "Sugar Taxes Are Unfair and Unhealthy," and select relevant textual details to support the various components of argument in response to the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: If the prices of all soda and candy TRIPLED, would you still buy them? If not, what would you buy instead?

2. Read text 4.

3. Nearpod--https://share.nearpod.com/zHnESMICRcb
Collaborative Discussion Boards

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Write an argument essay in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

Due:

1/7, Thurs. Work Folder  in Google Classroom

1/7, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will read text 3, "The Toxic Truth About Sugar," and select relevant textual details to support the various components of argument in response to the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: Name 7 things beginning with the letter "B."

2. Review selection of details from text 2.

3. Read text 3.
Breakout Room for close reading and guiding questions.

4. Select relevant textual details from text 3 to support each component of argument. Include citations.

5. Share out

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Read text 4.

Due:

1/6, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/6, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will read text 2, "Sugar Should Be Regulated As Toxin, Researchers Say," and select relevant textual details to support the various components of argument in response to the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer

2. Read text 2.
Breakout rooms as needed.

3. Select relevant textual details from text 2 to support each component of argument. Include citations.

4. Share out

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Read text 3.

Due:

TED Talk Argument Analysis in Google Classroom

TED Talk Argument Analysis

Find and watch a TED talk on TED.com. Choose a talk related to any topics discussed in class or simply watch one that features a speaker on a subject that interests you. As you watch the talk, evaluate its strengths as an argument, in terms of its thesis, claims, evidence, reasoning, and delivery. Write a brief analysis of the talk.

Your analysis should include answers to the following questions:

1. What is the title of the TED talk that you watched?
2. Who is the speaker?
3. What is the speaker’s thesis (message)?
4. Does the speaker back up his or her claims with research or anecdotes? Give examples.
5. How would you describe the delivery (tone, body language, etc.) of the speaker?
6. Overall, how convincing is the speaker’s argument? Explain.

Please reference the link below for support with describing the speaker's tone. There is a writing template attached for you if you would like to use it. You may also create and attach your own response in a GoogleDoc.

Due:

1/5, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/5, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will read text 1, "FDA Urged to Regulate Sugar in Drinks," and gather evidence to support a position on the topic: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod--https://share.nearpod.com/q7tJF5mlMcb

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: What is your favorite candy or snack?

2. Previewing the argument topic: Prior to delving into the research on the pros and cons of governmental regulations on sugar, what position would you take in response to the question: Should the United States government create strict sugar regulations? Why?

3. Read and annotate paragraphs 1-6 (lines 1-24) of text 1.

4. Discussion/Close Reading Questions:
1. According to text 1, why should the FDA regulate the amount of added sugars in soda and other sweetened beverages? (par. 1)
2. If the FDA considers "sugar to be a safe food at the recommended level of consumption" (line 5), why does sugar still pose a problem for many Americans? (par. 2)
3. In addition to obesity, what kinds of related health issues can occur due to increased sugar consumption? (par. 3)
4. What evidence supports the claim that sugar can lead to diabetes? (par. 4)
5. How can you use former counsel of the FDA Jeffrey Senger's quote, “Any food, if it’s abused, can be unhealthy,” (lines 22-23) to support the position that the US government should create strict sugar regulations?
6. How can you use former counsel of the FDA Jeffrey Senger's quote, “Any food, if it’s abused, can be unhealthy,” (lines 22-23) to support the position that the US government should NOT create strict sugar regulations?

5. Share out

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

* Homework: Finish reading and annotating text 1.

Due:

1/4/21, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

1/4/21, Mon. Work Folder

Happy New Year 2021!

Learning Objective: Students will view a TED talk, then write an analysis of the speaker's argument.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: As we begin the New Year 2021, what is one piece of advice that you would like to share with your peers? Write your New Year's message in the Zoom chat box.

2. Components of Argument in a TED talk
Ted talk: "How books can open your mind"
https://www.ted.com/talks/lisa_bu_how_books_can_open_your_mind?referrer=playlist-talks_to_inspire_new_year_s_re#t-345788

Asynchronous Assignment:
Find and watch a TED talk on TED.com. Choose a talk related to any topics discussed in class or simply watch one that features a speaker on a subject that interests you. As you watch the talk, evaluate its strengths as an argument, in terms of its thesis, claims, evidence, reasoning, and delivery. Write a brief analysis of the talk.

Your analysis should include answers to the following questions:

1. What is the title of the TED talk that you watched?
2. Who is the speaker?
3. What is the speaker’s thesis (message)?
4. Does the speaker back up his or her claims with research or anecdotes? Give examples.
5. How would you describe the delivery (tone, body language, etc.) of the speaker?
6. Overall, how convincing is the speaker’s argument? Explain.

3. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/23, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/23, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will use text 4 "Solitude and Leadership" to delineate the components of argument in response to the topic: Is the impact of social media on an individual beneficial or harmful?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: What are you hoping for in the New Year 2021? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review text 4.

3. Sentence stems to map out an argument:
1. Text 4 supports the position that...
2. One claim that the article gives is...
3. The article's claim that reading a book is better than reading words on social media is supported by the quote...
4. This quote means...
5. Therefore...
6. In contrast, the opposing side might say...
7. This might also seem true, but in reality...

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/22, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/22, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will use text 4 "Solitude and Leadership" to delineate the components of argument in response to the topic: Is the impact of social media on an individual beneficial or harmful?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: Have you ever read a book that changed your life or made you think differently? If not, what is a topic that you would want to read a book about? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review text 4.

3. Sentence stems to map out an argument:
1. Text 4 supports the position that...
2. One claim that the article gives is...
3. The article's claim that reading a book is better than reading words on social media is supported by the quote...
4. This quote means...
5. Therefore...
6. In contrast, the opposing side might say...
7. This might also seem true, but in reality...

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Social Media - Text 4 - Outline in Google Classroom

Social Media - Text 4 - Outline

Due:

12/21, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/21, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will read Text 4, "Solitude and Leadership," and gather evidence to support a position on the topic: Is the impact of social media on an individual beneficial or harmful?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: Do you prefer silence or noise? Explain. Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Making connections/How to support your position using textual information

3. Sentence stems to map out an argument:
1. Text 4 supports the position that...
2. One claim that the article gives is...
3. The article's claim that reading a book is better than reading words on social media is supported by the quote...
4. This quote means...
5. Therefore...
6. In contrast, the opposing side might say...
7. This might also seem true, but in reality...

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Social Media - Text 3 - Questions in Google Classroom

Social Media - Text 3 - Questions

Learning Objective: Students will analyze the information in text 3, "The Flight from Conversation," to develop a claim about the impact of social media on conversation.

Please use full sentences to answer each question.

Due:

12/18, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/18, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will analyze the information in text 3, "The Flight from Conversation," to develop a claim about the impact of social media on conversation.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Do Now: How is your day going? Write in the Zoom chat box.

Topic: Is the impact of social media on an individual beneficial or harmful?

Questions:

1. What was the experience like to use social media to have a conversation? What was good about it? What was bad about it?

2. The title "The Flight from Conversation," suggests that social media stunts meaningful conversation.
Which side does this claim support?

3. Using text 3, what information can you use to support this claim?

4. Explain how you could use the following information to support the claim that social media stunts meaningful conversation:

Texting and e-mail and posting let us present the self we want
to be. This means we can edit. And if we wish to, we can delete. Or
retouch: the voice, the flesh, the face, the body. Not too much, not
too little -- just right.

5. Is there a way that you could use this same information (above excerpt) to support the opposing claim, that social media promotes meaningful conversation?

6. What can you say to rebut the claim that social media stunts meaningful conversation?

7. What can you say to rebut the claim that social media promotes meaningful conversation?

Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate Text 4--"Solitude and Leadership"

Due:

12/17, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/17, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will read text 3, "The Flight from Conversation," and gather evidence to support a position on the topic: Is the impact of social media on an individual beneficial or harmful?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod:
https://share.nearpod.com/yorNmWUehcb

1. Do Now: How would you describe a good conversation?

2. Review of text 3--"The Flight from Conversation"

3. Collaborative Discussion Boards (small-groups)--
Conversation Questions

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate Text 4--"Solitude and Leadership"

Due:

12/16, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/16, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will read text 2, "Impact of Social Media on Adolescent Behavior in California," analyze the information in the data tables, and gather evidence to support a position on the topic: Is the impact of social media on an individual beneficial or harmful?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/QCSva9Hugcb

1. Do Now: Poll--What types of social media do you use?

2. Review of text 2.

3. Collaborative Discussion Boards--
1. What inferences or conclusions can you draw from the first table: "Most Commonly Used Social Media by Teens"?
2. What inferences or conclusions can you draw from the second table: "What Teens Do Online: Protective Aspects"?
3. How can you use the information or data in either data table to support the position that social media is beneficial?
4. Is it possible to use this same information or data to support the opposing position that social media is harmful? If so, explain.
5. In giving a rebuttal to a counterclaim, you could state possible limitations or flaws with the information in the text. What are the possible limitations or flaws of the text?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate Text 3--"The Flight from Conversation"

Due:

12/15, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/15, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will read Text 1, "A Word About Social Networking," and gather evidence to support a position on the topic: Is the impact of social media on an individual beneficial or harmful?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/kiRNo2LnCab

1. Do Now: Prior to delving into the research on the pros and cons of social media, what position would you take in response to the question: Is the impact of social media on an individual beneficial or harmful? Why?

2. Review youtube video: "Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences"/Impressions

3. Collaborative Discussion Boards--Advantages and Risks of Social Networking

4. Building Evidence through Anecdotes--
Open-ended Question: How has social media personally impacted you?

5. Share out

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate Text 2--"Impact of Social Media on Adolescent Behavioral Health in California"

Due:

Short Response on Social Media Video (Source #1) in Google Classroom

Short Response on Social Media Video (Source #1)

Short Response: After viewing the video "Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences," what is something that resonated with you? Explain.

Due:

12/14, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/14, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will watch a video on the effects of social media on teenagers and gather evidence to support a position on the topic: Is the impact of social media on an individual beneficial or harmful?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What is your favorite social media platform? Why?
Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Motivation: Most Popular Social Media - Growth Evolution (2004-2020)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p-u2mENgWdQ

3. Review: Argument Terms

4. Source #1 -- youtube video: "Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGGDfciqyvw

5. Short Response (HW): After viewing the video, what is something that resonated with you? Explain.
* Please submit your response in the HOMEWORK section.

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate Text 1: A Word About Social Networking

Due:

12/11, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/11, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will develop an argument justifying the grade that they believe they should receive for the second marking period.

Do Now: What counterclaims do you think a teacher could present to students who believe they should receive a passing grade?
Write in the Zoom chat box.

Assignment:

Topic: What grade do you think you should receive for the second marking period?

Develop a well-developed argument justifying the grade that you believe you should get for the second marking period.

Remember to include each component of argument in your presentation.
POSITION-->REASONS-->EVIDENCE-->COUNTERCLAIMS-->REBUTTAL*ANALYSIS*

You may either present your argument in writing or in a Flipgrip recording. https://flipgrid.com/ba6da0e9
If you are writing your argument, please attach it to this work folder.

* Exit Ticket -- Before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/10, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/10, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to plan out and write an argument essay on the topic:
Should self-driving cars replace human drivers?"

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now: After reading all four texts on the topic of self-driving cars, which position would you take? Explain your decision.
Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review: ELA Regents Argument Task and Rubrics

3. Writing support (planning/outlining)

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

12/9, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/9, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will...
1. identify the components of argument in text 4: "Along for the Ride."
2. analyze information from the text to develop their own arguments on the topic: "Should self-driving cars replace human drivers?"

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/s2Xnt8HQ4bb

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: How do you pass the time when you are on a long car, train, or plane ride?
Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-lesson: Analyzing information and making connections

3. Nearpod Collaborative Discussion Boards (asynchronous learning)

4. Review of text 4

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Make sure you have read and annotated all four texts.

Due:

12/8, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/8, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will use a checklist to evaluate their peers' Flipgrid argument recordings.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now: What was the experience like for you to record a Flipgrid video on your argument: should self-driving cars replace human drivers?

2. Review checklist of Components of an Argument (Argument Vocabulary Reference Sheet).

3. Preview ELA Regents Argument Rubric

4. Peer-critique of Flipgrid videos.
Were all components of argument given in the presentation?
Was the argument convincing?
How could the presentation have been better?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate text 4.

Due:

12/7, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/7, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will develop an argument on the topic: "Should self-driving cars replace human drivers?" using text 3-- "Autonomous Vehicles Will Replace Taxi Drivers, But That’s Just the Beginning."

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now: Based on the first two articles that you have read on autonomous vehicles, what position would you take on the topic: should self-driving cars replace human drivers? Why?

2. Review of ARGUMENT terms:

Argument = Position = Main Claim
Reason = Supporting Claim
Evidence
Citation
Counterclaim = Alternate or Opposing Claim
Rebuttal

3. Asynchronous Learning -- Using the information in text 3, record a mini-argument on the topic.
Flipgrid: https://flipgrid.com/eae6e451

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate text 4.

Due:

12/4, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/4, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will develop an argument on the topic: "Should self-driving cars replace human drivers?" using text 2-- "Google’s Driverless Cars Run Into Problem: Cars With Drivers."

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod:
https://share.nearpod.com/NFSKYyezWbb

1. Do Now:
Watch the video: "What is Google's Driverless car?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmw7w97a6LA
What are your thoughts about this kind of car? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review of ARGUMENT terms:

Argument = Position = Main Claim
Reason = Supporting Claim
Evidence
Citation
Counterclaim = Alternate or Opposing Claim
Rebuttal

3. Nearpod Collaborative Discussion Boards (asynchronous learning)
Identifying each component of argument in text 2

4. Review of text 2's argument

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate text 3.

Due:

12/3, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/3, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will develop an argument on the topic: "Should self-driving cars replace human drivers?," using text 1-- "How Google's Self-Driving Car Will Change Everything." (continued)

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod:
https://share.nearpod.com/MPPiBdVfTbb

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: What is the longest car ride that you have ever been on? Where did you go?
Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review of ARGUMENT terms:

Argument = Position = Main Claim
Reason = Supporting Claim
Evidence
Citation
Counterclaim = Alternate or Opposing Claim
Rebuttal

3. Nearpod Collaborative Discussion Boards (asynchronous learning)
Identifying each component of argument in text 1

4. Review of text 1's argument

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate text 2.

Due:

12/2 Wed., Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/2 Wed., Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will develop an argument on the topic: "Should self-driving cars replace human drivers?," using text 1-- "How Google's Self-Driving Car Will Change Everything."

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod:
https://share.nearpod.com/MPPiBdVfTbb

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: What is something that you would want to invent? Describe what your creation would be able to do.
Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review of ARGUMENT terms:

Argument = Position = Main Claim
Reason = Supporting Claim
Evidence
Citation
Counterclaim = Alternate or Opposing Claim
Rebuttal

3. Nearpod Collaborative Discussion Boards (asynchronous learning)
Identifying each component of argument in text 1

4. Review of text 1's argument

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate text 2.

Due:

12/1, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

12/1, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will understand the format for giving an argument, including key terms. (continued)

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/Yj1LPX6TPbb

1. Do Now/Energizer: Draw a picture or upload an image of your dream car. Include a caption describing its features.

2. Motivation: a virtual ride in an autonomous vehicle
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGbaEYvxYJw

3. Introduction to Argument (ELA Regents Task)
Topic: Should self-driving cars replace human drivers?
........................................................................................................................................................................................................
4. Format for giving an Argument:
Argument = Position = Main Claim
Reason = Supporting Claim
Evidence
Citation
Counterclaim = Alternate or Opposing Claim
Rebuttal

5. Previewing the argument topic (prior knowledge)
Nearpod Activities:
1. Your ARGUMENT/POSITION/MAIN CLAIM - Should self-driving cars replace human drivers? [poll]
2. REASON/SUPPORTING CLAIM - Why do you think self-driving cars should or should not replace human drivers? [collaborative board]
3. EVIDENCE - Can you give any published facts that support your reason? Include a CITATION. [collaborative board]
4. COUNTERCLAIM/ALTERNATE or OPPOSING CLAIM - What do you think the opposing side might say? [collaborative board]
5. REBUTTAL - What can you say in response to defend your own argument? [collaborative board]

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate text 1.

Due:

11/30, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/30, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will understand the format for giving an argument, including key terms. (2 classes)

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/Yj1LPX6TPbb

1. Do Now/Energizer: Draw a picture or upload an image of your dream car. Include a caption describing its features.

2. Motivation: a virtual ride in an autonomous vehicle
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGbaEYvxYJw

3. Introduction to Argument (ELA Regents Task)
Topic: Should self-driving cars replace human drivers?
...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................
4. Format for giving an Argument:
Argument = Position = Main Claim
Reason = Supporting Claim
Evidence
Citation
Counterclaim = Alternate or Opposing Claim
Rebuttal

5. Previewing the argument topic (prior knowledge)
Nearpod Activities:
1. Your ARGUMENT/POSITION/MAIN CLAIM - Should self-driving cars replace human drivers? [poll]
2. REASON/SUPPORTING CLAIM - Why do you think self-driving cars should or should not replace human drivers? [collaborative board]
3. EVIDENCE - Can you give any published facts that support your reason? Include a CITATION. [collaborative board]
4. COUNTERCLAIM/ALTERNATE or OPPOSING CLAIM - What do you think the opposing side might say? [collaborative board]
5. REBUTTAL - What can you say in response to defend your own argument? [collaborative board]

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

HOMEWORK: Read and annotate text 1.

Due:

11/25, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/25, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to identify examples of literary elements and writing strategies.

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: What are you grateful for? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review literary elements and writing strategies. Kahoot!
https://kahoot.it/challenge/09294617?challenge-id=58dde52f-dd07-4c67-be88-e7776de1e2ef_1606252733636

3. Text-based response: analysis of a central idea AND a literary element/writing strategy

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Due:

11/24, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/24, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to develop a central idea statement about the story "The Story of an Hour."

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

Nearpod https://share.nearpod.com/lvcmzmS2Fbb

1. Do Now/Energizer: What does it mean to be "free" in a relationship?
Draw your representation or symbol of freedom.

2. Mini-Lesson: Developing a Central Idea Statement (Claim)

3. Collaborative Discussion Boards: As you are reading, what ideas come to mind?

4. Writing a Central Idea Statement

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/23, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/23, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will review key concepts and the plot of "The Story of an Hour."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Why do you think Chopin titled her story "The Story of an Hour"?

2. Review key concepts and the plot of "The Story of an Hour." Kahoot!
Game pin: 9691159

3. Writing Revisions: Using additional writing strategies, revise your text-based response on a central idea in "The Story of an Hour."

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/20, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/20, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to use rubrics to evaluate and revise their text-based response on "The Story of an Hour."

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Energizer: Choose a camera video filter that suits your mood today!

2. Do Now: In your own words, explain what this quote means: "...she was drinking in a very elixir of life through that open window" (par. 13).

3. Writing strategy: using quotes to support a central idea

4. Work Period: Be sure to use the attached resources along with your annotations to guide your writing and peer-feedback discussions.
Breakout Room 1: Asynchronous writing
Breakout Room 2: Peer-critiquing
Breakout Room 3: Peer-critiquing
Breakout Room 4: Peer-critiquing
Breakout Room 5: Teacher Feedback

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Text-based Response on

Text-based Response on "The Story of an Hour"

Write a text-based response analyzing how Chopin uses irony to develop a central idea in "The Story of an Hour".

Due:

11/19, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/19, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to analyze how Chopin uses irony to develop a central idea in "The Story of an Hour"?

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Agenda:

1. Do Now/Energizer: Compete the following sentence stem: Love is... (Write in the Zoom chat box.)

2. Mini-Lesson:
1. Review Irony (verbal/dramatic/situational)
2. Writing a text-based response using the TEAL format.

3. Video: "The Story of an Hour" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofAiwejmMqo&t=257s
What is the central idea of the story? What writing strategies are used to develop this central idea?

4. Writing Assignment:
Write a text-based response analyzing how Chopin uses irony to develop a central idea in "The Story of an Hour".

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/18, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/18, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. Understand the various types of structures that can be used to tell a story.
2. Explain how the structure of "The Story of an Hour" impacts the development of the story's plot.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Nearpod https://share.nearpod.com/XMUapWh0ubb

1. Review Structure: Match the term with its definition.

2. Discussion in breakout rooms:
Complete the two Nearpod activities assigned to your group.
1. If you were to use one of the other structure types to rewrite "The Story of an Hour," how would you begin the story?
2. What impact or purpose would organizing the story in this way have on developing the key ideas of the story?
Groups: 1- In media res: Kyle, Evan, Dontae, NKayla
2- Flashback: Nyece, Sammy, Tasnim, Shamar, Keon
3- Framed narrative: Jaleel, Michael, Nashawn, Ryan, Chloe
4- Epistolary: Sorayah, Cyann, Scarlet, Jazzy

3. Share-out

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/17, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/17, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to explain how the structure of "The Story of an Hour" develops key ideas in the story.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: In you were to write your autobiography, what would you write as the first sentence of your life story? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: the function of a story's structure (linear, nonlinear, in media res, flashback, framed narrative, epistolary)

3. Discussion in breakout rooms (each room will be given one of the structure types to discuss):
If you were to use one of the other structure types to rewrite "The Story of an Hour," how would you begin the story?
What purpose would organizing the story in this way have on developing the key ideas of the story?

4. Share-out

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/16, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/16, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to understand key ideas in "The Story of an Hour" and summarize the plot of the story.

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: What reactions or questions do you have about "The Story of an Hour"?

2. Review key ideas and plot. Kahoot! (self-paced learning) https://kahoot.it/challenge/09617866?challenge-id=58dde52f-dd07-4c67-be88-e7776de1e2ef_1605474828746

3. Writing Assignment: Write a one-paragraph summary of "The Story of an Hour."
Go to Google classroom: Classwork/Writing Assessments/Plot Summary of "The Story of an Hour"

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/13, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/13, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the impact that the setting has on other elements of a story in "The Story of an Hour."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Yesterday's assignment was to write a paragraph analyzing the impact that the story's setting has on another element (characters, conflict, mood, theme, etc.).

Do Now: What challenges or questions do you have about yesterday's writing assignment? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review strategies for writing a text-based response on "the function of setting."

3. Peer-critique/Revisions (Breakout rooms will be scheduled according to student needs)

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Plot Summary of

Plot Summary of "The Story of an Hour"

Write a one-paragraph summary of the short story "The Story of an Hour." Be sure to use your own words.

Due:

11/12, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/12, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to analyze the impact that the setting has on other elements of a story in "The Story of an Hour."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: What make-believe world would you want to live in?
https://jamboard.google.com/d/1OEDmYicdzpnAGrZFAcSOxjjbNFia7duSqm_nHS8YeAw/edit?usp=sharing

2. Mini-Lesson: the function of a story's setting
Consider a story that takes place in a school. What would be the function or impact of the setting on the development of characters, conflict, mood, and themes?

3. Reading: "The Story of an Hour"
https://www.owleyes.org/text/the-story-of-an-hour/read/chopins-short-story#root-36

4. Discussion:
1. Review--What is the setting of "The Story of an Hour"?
2. How does the the setting impact other elements of the story?

5. Writing Assignment: Write a paragraph analyzing the impact that the story's setting has on another element (characters, conflict, mood, theme, etc.). Go to Google classroom: Classwork/Writing Assessments/Function of Setting - "The Story of an Hour"

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Function of Setting -

Function of Setting - "The Story of an Hour"

Writing Assignment: Write a paragraph analyzing the impact that the story's setting has on another element (characters, conflict, mood, theme, etc.).

Due:

11/10, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/10, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify and describe specific textual details that convey or reveal a setting in "The Story of an Hour."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: How would you describe the setting of your neighborhood? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Setting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30CPmgVQNks

3. Reading: "The Story of an Hour" (paragraphs 1-5)
https://www.owleyes.org/text/the-story-of-an-hour/read/chopins-short-story#root-36

4. Discussion:
1. How does setting contribute to the plot of a story?
2. What is the setting of "The Story of an Hour"?
Use the attached graphic organizer to identify and describe specific textual details that convey or reveal a setting in paragraphs 1-5 of "The Story of an Hour."

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/9, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/9, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to read and annotate Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: If you could have an extra hour today to do anything that you wanted, what would you do with the time? Write in the Zoom chat box.

2. About the Author: Kate Chopin https://www.katechopin.org/


3. Reading: "The Story of an Hour"
text: https://www.owleyes.org/text/the-story-of-an-hour/read/chopins-short-story#root-36
audio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9S4btsmp70

4. As you read, annotate the text. Include commentary about key ideas, writing strategies, vocabulary words, questions, reactions, etc.

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/6, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/6, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to use rubrics to evaluate and revise their text-based response on "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Energizer: Choose a camera video filter that suits your mood today!

2. Do Now: Review rubrics for writing a text-based response. In your own words, summarize what must a text-based response must have in order for it to receive the highest score. Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

3. Work Period:
Breakout Room 1: Asynchronous writing
Breakout Room 2: Peer-critiquing
Breakout Room 3: Peer-critiquing
Breakout Room 4: Peer-critiquing
Breakout Room 5: Teacher Feedback

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/5, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/5, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to use rubrics to evaluate and revise their text-based response on "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Energizer: Choose a camera video filter that suits your mood today!

2. Do Now: What challenges did you have writing your text-based response on "My Last Duchess"?
Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

3. Rereading of "My Last Duchess" (have students read out loud)

4. Open Discussion:
What questions are left unanswered about the Duke? The Duchess? What other questions do you still have about what takes place in this dramatic monologue?

5. Mini-Lesson: writing a text-based central idea response/using rubrics to help you evaluate and revise written work

6. Asynchronous Writing

7. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

11/4, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/4, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning uses symbolism to ultimately develop the Duke's character in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/NS7CCpCzHab
Do Now/Energizer: What is an object of great importance to you? Why?

2. Mini-Lesson: Symbolism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkI6cn8wwgM

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 47-56)
Vocabulary: munificence, dowry

4. Discussion:
1. What questions are left unanswered about the Duke? The Duchess? What other questions do you still have about what takes place in this dramatic monologue? (collaborative discussion board)
2. How convinced are you that the Duke had the Duchess executed (or at least, locked up in a dungeon)? (poll)
3. How does the double-meaning of the word "object" (line 53) confirm the suspicious nature of the Duke? (collaborative discussion board)
4. What is the impact of the word choice "taming" (line 55)? (collaborative discussion board)
5. How is the bronze statue of Neptune symbolic? (collaborative discussion board)

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

Text-based Response on

Text-based Response on "My Last Duchess"

Due:

11/3, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/3, Tues. Work Folder

Election Day - Remote Instruction (Asynchronous)

Catch up with work and practice self-care!

Please click on the "MARK AS DONE" button in this folder to receive attendance and class participation credit for today.

Due:

11/2, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

11/2, Mon. Work Folder

Do Now: What were your reactions to the Duke's "commands"? Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

Audio Recording: "My Last Duchess" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZxq3r7TlHo

Asynchronous Writing Assignment: Text-based Response on "My Last Duchess"
Go to:
Google classroom/Writing Assessments/Text-based Response on "My Last Duchess"


Due:

10/30, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/30, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how verbal irony contributes to the development of the Duke's character in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/jWegmMGJYab
Do Now: Based on your understanding of irony, give an example of irony from any literary work, movie, or television show.

2. Mini-Lesson: Verbal Irony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiR-bnCHIYo
double entendre -- a word or phrase open to two interpretations, one of which is usually risqué or indecent.

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 34-47)

4. Breakout Rooms/Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. What is ironic about lines 34-35, "Who'd stoop to blame this sort of trifling?"
2. How is the word "lessoned" (line 40) a double entendre?
3. Reread lines 45-46: "I gave commands; then all smiles stopped together." To whom did the Duke "give commands"? What do you think his command was?
4. How is the phrase "as if alive" (line 47) a double entendre?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/29, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/29, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning uses irony to develop the complex character of the Duke in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/rkyWfJthXab

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: Describe a time when someone or something surprised you. What made this event so surprising to you?

2. Mini-Lesson: Irony (verbal/dramatic/situational)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEDxPwwMkBk
How is irony used in each of these cinematic scenes?

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 34-43)

4. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. What does the word "stoop" (line 34) suggest about how the Duke views the Duchess?
2. What does the Duke say about his own speaking ability (lines 35-36)?
3. What other things does the Duke say that might make the reader suspicious of his character?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/28, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/28, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how the Duke's point of view develops the characterization of the Duchess in "My Last Duchess." (continued)

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/yv4dMZTJVab
Do Now: Draw a picture or upload an image of one of the following:
1. a child hugging a stuffed animal
2. a gorgeous sunset
3. a branch of cherries
4. a person riding a horse

2. Review: Point of View (first person/omniscient/objective/limited)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0OSmvCXiTg
From what point of view is the story being told? What is the Duke's point of view about the Duchess?

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 21-34)

4. Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/vsph/NvUiKlJbMu
Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. Reread lines 21-22: "She had a heart --how shall I say?--too soon made glad/Too easily impressed..." What is the effect of the repetition in these lines?
2. What does the Duke mean when he claims the Duchess' "looks went everywhere" (line 24)?
3. Reread lines 25-29. What is something that would make the Duchess happy or "blush" (line 31)? Draw or upload an image of it.

4. From the Duke's perspective, how does the Duchess value his "gift of a nine-hundred years old name" (line 32)?
5. What inferences can you make about the Duchess based on lines 1-34?

5. Writing Response: How does the Duke describe the Duchess? Would you consider the Duke's point of view of the Duchess to be objective or limited? Why?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/27, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/27, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how the Duke's point of view develops the characterization of the Duchess in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda (to be completed over 2 classes):

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Nearpod-- https://share.nearpod.com/vsph/NvUiKlJbMu

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: What is something that makes you happy?

2. Review asynchronous Nearpod assignment (10/26).

3. Mini-Lesson: Point of View (first person/omniscient/objective/limited)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0OSmvCXiTg
From what point of view is the story being told? What is the Duke's point of view about the Duchess?

4. Vocabulary https://docs.google.com/document/d/1S2k0AXwT3sGAMAmXljaGp9TORHbQpNM8NGm2VHHiQiE/edit

5. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 21-34)

6. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. Reread lines 21-22: "She had a heart --how shall I say?--too soon made glad/Too easily impressed..." What is the effect of the repetition in these lines?
2. What does the Duke mean when he claims the Duchess' "looks went everywhere" (line 24)?
3. Reread lines 25-29. What is something that would make the Duchess happy or "blush" (line 31)? Draw or upload an image of it.
4. From the Duke's perspective, how does the Duchess value his "gift of a nine-hundred years old name" (line 32)?
5. What inferences can you make about the Duchess based on lines 1-34?

7. Writing Response: How does the Duke describe the Duchess? Would you consider the Duke's point of view of the Duchess to be objective or limited? Why?

8. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/26, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/26, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning develops the characters of the Duke and Duchess in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda (abbreviated class):

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Nearpod (self-paced): https://share.nearpod.com/jsKBIB6hSab
1. Do Now/Energizer Question: Mark Twain once said, "I can live for two months on a good compliment."
Think about the meaning of his quote. What is the best compliment that anyone has ever given you?

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization--What does the Duke say about the Duchess? How do we learn more about the Duke based on what he says about the Duchess?

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 13-24)

4. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. In your own words, rewrite Fra Pandolf's compliment to the Duchess: (lines 16-19).
2. What word(s) does the Duke use to describe the compliments that the Duchess might have received from Fra Pandolf? What might the Duke's choice of words tell you about himself?

Asynchronous--
3. Reread lines 21-22: "She had a heart --how shall I say?--too soon made glad/Too easily impressed..." What is the effect of the repetition in these lines?
4. What does the Duke mean when he claims the Duchess' "looks went everywhere"?
5. What else do you learn about the Duke and Duchess in lines 13-24?

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/23, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/23, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning develops the character of the Duchess in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

Nearpod -- Nearpod code: 3WC4N
https://app.nearpod.com/?pin=3wc4n

* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now/Energizer Question: Describe what you look for in a significant other.

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization (direct/indirect)

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 21-34)

4. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. Reread lines 21-22: "She had a heart --how shall I say?--too soon made glad/Too easily impressed..." What is the effect of the repetition in these lines?
2. What does the Duke mean when he claims the Duchess's "looks went everywhere"?
3. What inferences can you make about the Duchess based on lines 25-29?
4. From the Duke's perspective, how does the Duchess value his "gift of a nine-hundred years old name" (line 32)?

5. Writing Response: What do you learn about the characters of the Duke and the Duchess in lines 29-34? What is left uncertain about the Duke and Duchess in these lines?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/22, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/22, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning develops the character of the Duke in "My Last Duchess."
(continuation)

Agenda:

Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Review lines 1-2: "That's my last Duchess painted on the wall/Looking as if she were alive."
What might the phrase "looking as if she were alive" tell you about the Duchess or the painting of the Duchess?
Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization (direct/indirect)
What does the Duke say? What are the actions of the Duke?

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 1-21)

4. Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/ioRMxHdovab
Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. For what reasons might the Duke mention Fra Pandolf twice in the first six lines of the poem?
2. Where does the Duke keep the painting of the Duchess?

5. Writing Response: What do you learn about the portrait? How does this develop your understanding of the Duke's character?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit.

Due:

10/21, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/21, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Browning develops the character of the Duke in "My Last Duchess."

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://share.nearpod.com/ioRMxHdovab
* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Review-- "That's my last Duchess painted on the wall..."
1. What is the literal definition and part of speech of the word "my"? What might the speaker's use of the word "my" suggest about his tone?
2. What is the literal definition and part of speech of the word "last"? What might the use of the word "last" mean about the Duchess?

2. Mini-Lesson: Characterization (direct/indirect)

3. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 1-21)

4. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. What tone does the Duke display when he says, "Will 't please you sit and look at her?"
2. For what reasons might the Duke mention Fra Pandolf twice in the first six lines of the poem?
3. Where does the Duke keep the painting of the Duchess?

5. Writing Response: What do you learn about the portrait? How does this develop your understanding of the Duke's character?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/20, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/20, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. read and annotate lines 1-8 of "My Last Duchess."
2. identify word choice in lines 1-8 that impacts the poem's meaning and the speaker's tone.

Success Criteria: To receive full credit, students will annotate the pronouns in "My Last Duchess" and complete Nearpod collaborate boards, identifying specific words the author uses to convey a tone.

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://share.nearpod.com/kU25oFNSIab
* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: What do you see in the painting?

2. About the Author: Robert Browning

3. Mini-Lesson: Word Choice

4. Reading: "My Last Duchess" (lines 1-8)
Annotate the pronouns. (See attached reference document below for support).

5. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. What specific words and phrases does the speaker use to describe the Duchess? What do these words suggest about the Duchess?
2. What does the reader learn about the Duchess from the description of her portrait in the first eight lines of the poem?

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/19, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/19, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to preview and demonstrate background knowledge of key vocabulary terms presented in the first 8 lines of Robert Browning’s dramatic monologue, “My Last Duchess”

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

Nearpod: https://share.nearpod.com/CLhGw8KbFab

1. Do Now/Energizer: “Catch!”. This works best when all cameras are on AND zooms are in gallery mode. The teacher will throw an imaginary ball to a student to begin the game. When you catch the ball, you will give us one word to describe your weekend. After you share your word, you will throw the ball to a student who hasn’t shared yet.

2. Nearpod:
Draw It! Board for your understanding of Duke/Duchess
Vocabulary Preview: a few words from the first 8 lines of our next poem

3. Exit Ticket -- To be completed asynchronously (after class):
Ensure your text analysis response for “We Wear the Mask” has been submitted. Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit for today.

Due:

Text-Analysis Response on

Text-Analysis Response on "We Wear the Mask"

Your Task:

Closely read the poem “We Wear the Mask” and write a well-developed, text-based response of two to three paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the text and analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text.

Please utilize the attached document for sentence starters and word strategy/central idea word banks to help you organize your ideas.

Due:

10/16, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/16, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to write a text-analysis response on "We Wear the Mask."

Agenda:

* Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Using the attached rubric, what score would you give this writing sample (attached below) for each criterion? What overall score would you give the response?

2. Writing Instruction: Developing Ideas

3. Work Period:
Write a text-analysis response on "We Wear the Mask."
*SUBMIT FOR GRADING* [Google Classroom/Classwork/Writing Assessments/Text-Analysis Response on "We Wear the Mask"]

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before exiting TODAY, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit for today.

Due:

"We Wear the Mask" - Copy to Annotate

You can use the comment feature of Google Docs to annotate the poem here.

Due:

10/15, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/15, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives:
Students will be able to understand how Dunbar uses metaphor to develop a central idea in "We Wear the Mask."

Agenda:

* Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Simply, tell me how your day is going so far? Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Metaphor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPEmbt8Qoy0

3. Discussion in breakout rooms:
1. What writing strategies does Dunbar use in "We Wear the Mask"?
2. What does __________ mean in the poem? (interpreting examples of metaphors/figurative language/diction)

4. Share out

5. Writing instruction: Use metaphor in your own writing to convey how your day is going so far. *Exit Ticket

6. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before exiting TODAY, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to receive attendance and class participation credit for today .

Please reference the attached document to support your understanding of metaphors.

Due:

10/14, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/14, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. compose a central idea (thesis statement) about the identity of the speaker in "We Wear the Mask."
2. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://Nearpod.com Join Code: 2PFYE
* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: What is something that most people don't know about you that you are willing to share?

2. Mini-Lesson: Composing a Central Idea about the Speaker of a text

3. Collaborative Discussion Boards:
1. Why can’t the speaker be honest with most people in America?
2. Explain the expression, “Eyes are the windows to the soul.” What can eyes reveal?
3. Give an example of masked emotions and explain why that person feels the need.
4. Could this poem have been written today and still describe present day people and situations? Why or why not?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/13, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/13, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to read and annotate a poem "We Wear the Mask" by Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Agenda:

1. Do Now: Describe the mask or costume you would wear to a masquerade (a party, dance, or other festive gathering of persons wearing masks and other disguises)? Write your answer in the Zoom chat box.
Support: Images of masquerade masks and costumes
https://www.google.com/search?q=masquerade+pictures&oq=masquerade+pictures&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l7.3987j0j15&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

2. Mini-Lesson: How to annotate a poem. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5TnKNP_LP4
Paul Laurence Dunbar: Author's Bio.

3. Read and annotate "We Wear the Mask." https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44203/we-wear-the-mask
Support: poem recitation by Maya Angelou. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HLol9InMlc

4. Discussion:
1. What are the speaker’s emotions?
2. What does it mean to wear a mask?
3. Why would a person wear a “mask?”

5. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

Text-based Response (Final Copy) -

Text-based Response (Final Copy) - "Everyday Use"

Due:

10/9, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/9, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to write and revise a text-based response, which includes a central idea, supporting evidence, and analysis, on "Everyday Use."

Agenda:

Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Using the attached rubric, what score would you give this writing sample (attached below) for each criterion? What overall score would you give the response?

2. Writing Instruction: Evidence/Analysis

3. Work Period:
Select one text-based response that you wrote on "Everyday Use." Proofread, revise, and edit it, using writing strategies discussed in class. *SUBMIT YOUR FINAL COPY FOR GRADING* [Google Classroom/Classwork/Writing Assessments/Text-based Response on "Everyday Use" -- Final Copy]

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/8, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/8, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to analyze how Walker uses symbolism to develop a central idea in "Everyday Use."

Agenda:

Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now:
1. Complete the Student Contact Sheet (please include your own cell phone #). https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfOQEC5mLA1ftkrIvLeRn7HPPMs3FbPtNjpKrmpI0uIvKF6Gg/viewform?usp=sf_link
2. What is something (an object) that is of great importance to you? Why?
Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson on Symbolism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkI6cn8wwgM
Take a look at the attached document for a symbolism refresher!

3. Whole-Class/Small-Group Discussion
* Think about the most important object in the story, the quilts. Think about the history of quilts, and discuss how the quilts may be symbols of something deeper.

* What other examples of symbolism are used in the story? How are these symbols representative of something deeper?

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.

Due:

10/7, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/7, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...

1. listen to and understand an interpretation of "Everyday Use."
2. compose a central idea (thesis statement) about heritage or "cultural artifact."
3. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

Agenda:

Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now:
heritage -- something that is handed down from the past, as a tradition: a national heritage of honor, pride, and courage. something that comes or belongs to one by reason of birth
What is something from your heritage that is of importance to you? Write your response in the Zoom chat box.
Reference the attached document with visuals representing heritage.

2. Audio-Photo interpretation of "Everyday Use" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bt16zLid2-w
As you view the video, pay particular attention to details and commentary about HERITAGE and CULTURAL ARTIFACT.
Also, continue to add to your annotations.

3. Whole-Class/Small-Group Discussion
* What does Dee say or do that reflects a growing interest in preserving her heritage? How is the butter churn used to contrast Dee's relationship with her heritage with Maggie's? Is there anything ironic about Dee's connection to her heritage?
* Think about the most important object in the story, the quilts. Think about the history of quilts, and discuss how the quilts may be symbols of something deeper.

4. Exit Ticket -- Write your learning takeaways and questions in the private message box. Finally, before leaving class today, you MUST click on the "MARK AS DONE" button to verify your attendance and class participation.


Due:

Central Idea: Mother-Daughter Relationship in

Central Idea: Mother-Daughter Relationship in "Everyday Use"

Write a text-based response of at least one paragraph, analyzing the central idea of a mother-daughter relationship in "Everyday Use."
Remember to --
1. Compose a central idea about Mother's relationship with one of her daughters, Dee or Maggie.
2. Provide specific and relevant textual evidence.
3. Make clear connections.

**Feel free to use the TEAL resources attached**

Due:

10/6, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/6, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...

1. compose a central idea (thesis statement) about a mother-daughter relationship in "Everyday Use."
2. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

Agenda:

Remember to take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: Describe your relationship with your mother or guardian. Write your response in the Zoom chat box.

2. Mini-Lesson: Composing a Central Idea about the RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN A MOTHER AND DAUGHTER

Question: What are some factors that affect your relationship with your mother?

3. Review Class Participation Grade

4. Whole-Class & Small-Group Discussion (See attached discussion sentence starters)
* What do you imagine the mother’s relationship with Dee was like when Dee was at home? Were they
close? How do you think the mother feels about Dee’s success? Is she proud or does she have
mixed feelings? What is the significance of the daydream where Mother and Dee are together on the
TV show?
* Think about the relationship between Maggie and her mother. How do you imagine they get along?
What clues are available to you from the text?

5. Text-based Response [Google Classroom/Writing Assessments/Central Idea: Mother-Daughter Relationship in "Everyday Use"] *SUBMIT FOR GRADE*
1. Compose a central idea about Mother's relationship with one of her daughters, Dee or Maggie.
2. Provide specific and relevant textual evidence.
3. Make clear connections.

6. Exit Ticket

Due:

10/5, Mon. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/5, Mon. Work Folder

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to...
1. compose a central idea (thesis statement) about the identity of one or more of the characters in "Everyday Use."
2. cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis.

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://Nearpod.com Join Code: SHRY9
* Do all work in Nearpod. Remember to always take notes in a handwritten or digital notebook.

1. Do Now: What makes us who we are? What factors contribute to shaping a person's identity?

2. Mini-Lesson: Composing a Central Idea about IDENTITY

3. Class Participation Grade

4. Whole-Class & Small-Group Discussion:
1. Select a character: Mother/Maggie/Dee
2. Compose a central idea about that character's identity.
3. Provide specific and relevant textual evidence.
4. Make clear connections.

5. Exit Ticket

Due:

HW:

HW: "Everyday Use" Annotations

Due:

Quiz: Characterization in Google Classroom

Quiz: Characterization

Due:

10/2, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/2, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: (continued) Students will be able to understand how Walker uses characterization to develop the character of the mother, Maggie, and Dee in "Everyday Use."

Agenda:

1. Do Now: 10-minute QUIZ on Characterization (see Google Doc attachment below). * SUBMIT for GRADE.

2. Breakout Rooms - Discussion and Character Analysis: mother/Maggie/Dee
Complete Nearpod slides for your assigned character. Nearpod -- https://app.nearpod.com/presentation?pin=JYIQD
1. What do you know about your character? Post elements of her character using the S.T.E.A.L. method.
2. Create a collage depicting your character's physical and personality traits.

3. Group Presentations

4. Exit Ticket

HW: Finish reading and annotating the short story "Everyday Use." (You do not need to submit your annotations this time.)

Have a good weekend!

Due:

10/1, Thurs. Work Folder in Google Classroom

10/1, Thurs. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to understand how Walker uses characterization to develop the character of the mother, Maggie, and Dee in "Everyday Use."

Agenda:

Nearpod -- https://app.nearpod.com/presentation?pin=JYIQD

* Do all work in Nearpod.

1. Do Now: Share one of your annotations from p. 1 of "Everyday Use." Include the paragraph number of your annotation. For example: In paragraph 2, I circled an unfamiliar word "homely." I looked up the the definition of the word, which means plain or ordinary looking.

2. Mini-lesson: Characterization
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCshdu8loDo

3. Breakout Rooms - Discussion and Character Sketch: mother/Maggie/Dee

4. Group Presentations

5. Exit Ticket

* HW: Read and annotate p. 2 of "Everyday Use." SUBMIT for GRADE.

Due:

9/30, Wed. Work Folder in Google Classroom

9/30, Wed. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to read and annotate a short story, "Everyday Use" by Alice Walker.

Agenda:

1. Do Now: When you read complex text, what are some annotation strategies that you use? (Example: Paraphrase ideas). Write your answer in the Zoom chat box.

2. Review: Central Idea of yesterday's video clip

3. Mini-lesson & Guided Practice: How to annotate a text
https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+annotate+text+while+reading&oq=how+to+annotate+text&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l7.7669j0j15&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#kpvalbx=_QTBzX4j7IaOt_QbL1aygAw18

4. Alice Walker: Author's Bio. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Alice-Walker

5. Read and annotate "Everyday Use" (p. 1).
https://intensiveenglish1.weebly.com/uploads/1/3/0/4/13041485/everyday_use_full-text.pdf

6. Exit Ticket
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeXQZSJcjpdMPq-6tyEXDf5GKf5gTPKE_lSBJuTCO2PW-RePQ/viewform

Due:

9/29, Tues. Work Folder in Google Classroom

9/29, Tues. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to determine a central idea in a literary work and support their analysis with specific and relevant details.

Agenda:
Nearpod -- self-paced: https://nearpod.com
Nearpod Code: NETRI
* Do all work in Nearpod.

1. Do Now: If your life were a movie, which one would it be? Explain your choice.

2. Mini-lesson: Central Idea

3. Video clip: "Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius - Getting Ready for School"
Literary Analysis: 1. Determine a central idea of the video clip. 2. Provide supporting evidence.

4. Exit Ticket
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeXQZSJcjpdMPq-6tyEXDf5GKf5gTPKE_lSBJuTCO2PW-RePQ/viewform

Due:

9/25 -- Do Now Assignment:

9/25 -- Do Now Assignment: "I, Too" by Langston Hughes

Fri., 9/25/20
15. minutes
Do Now:
Read the poem "I, Too" by Langston Hughes, then in one to two paragraphs, answer the following questions, providing supporting details and analysis:
1. What does the poem reveal about the speaker's identity?
2. How does Hughes use at least one literary technique to develop the speaker's identity?

Due:

9/25, Fri. Work Folder in Google Classroom

9/25, Fri. Work Folder

Learning Objective: Students will be able to cite strong and thorough evidence to support analysis of a speaker's "identity" ("I, Too" by Langston Hughes and various "I Am" poems written by students)

Agenda:

1. *Do Now (15 min.) - will be GRADED
Read the poem "I, Too" by Langston Hughes, then in one to two paragraphs, answer the following questions, providing supporting details and analysis (*rubric attached): https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/47558/i-too
Support: You may wish to watch a read-aloud of the poem. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CmKf9nZ_4I
1. What does the poem reveal about the speaker's identity?
2. How does Hughes use at least one literary technique to develop the speaker's identity?

2. Review & Mini-lesson

3. Breakout Rooms - students share out "I Am" poems; *note-taking

4. *Exit Ticket (access in Google classroom: Daily -- Exit Ticket)
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeXQZSJcjpdMPq-6tyEXDf5GKf5gTPKE_lSBJuTCO2PW-RePQ/viewform

Due:

9/25 -- Note Sheet for

9/25 -- Note Sheet for "I Am" poem

Use this note-taking template to record important ideas about the selected "I Am" poem.

Due:

9/23-9/25 --

9/23-9/25 -- "I Am..." poem

Write an "I Am..." using the examples and guidelines attached. The purpose of this exercise is to share a little more about your deeper identity--who you are, what you think about, what you hope for, etc. Please be ready to share.